1. fnaynay Junior Member

    English
    Is there an equivalent expression for "men are pigs" in French or should I just directly translate it as "les hommes sont cochons?"
     
  2. FROG36 Senior Member

    CANADA - FRENCH
    Les hommes sont tous des salauds.
     
  3. Cath.S.

    Cath.S. Senior Member

    Bretagne, France
    français de France
    Les hommes sont des porcs.
     
  4. fnaynay Junior Member

    English
    Is "les hommes sont tous des salauds" just slang or is it a vulgar term? I'm using it in a formal paper, so I don't want to be too crude. :)

    Merci en avance!
     
  5. janpol

    janpol Senior Member

    France
    France - français
    "Les hommes sont DES cochons" is better than "Les hommes sont cochons"
    Si tu veux dire les choses de manière plus "soft" et moins pessimiste, tu peux utiliser le proverbe : "Il y a un petit cochon qui sommeille dans le coeur de chaque homme."
     
  6. viera Senior Member

    Paris suburb
    English/French/Slovak
    I can't imagine how to work 'men are pigs' into a formal paper.
     
  7. fnaynay Junior Member

    English
    It's in quotes. I'm discussing the stereotypes that men face in society today.

    Is "Il y a un petit cochon qui sommeille dans le coeur de chaque homme" a common way of implying the same thing as "men are pigs" would in English?

    I don't really want to be "soft" or positive, I just don't want to be vulgar.
     
  8. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Et maintenant grâce au génie génétique il y a un petit coeur de cochon dans chaque homme qui sommeillerait sans !;)
     
  9. Padraig Senior Member

    Ireland
    Hiberno-English, Irish Gaelic
    Use writing devices to make the suggestion indirect: e.g. Il y a ceux qui disent que...
     
  10. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    I think that French often seems to prefer conditional sentences for that sort of sentence where the subject is not specified, eg "il y a ceux qui diraient que..." but maybe it's a matter of whether you agree with these people or not, or how much you might agree.
     
  11. Padraig Senior Member

    Ireland
    Hiberno-English, Irish Gaelic
    I take your point, timpeac, and defer to your greater knowledge. I felt that my suggestion could be improved upon, but didn't see how.

    It now generates two level of indirection, and fnaynay could hardly be accused of being vulgar but could be credited with being aware of the existence of vulgar attitudes.
     
  12. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Oh not at all! It was only a suggestion, born of a non-native impression:). I'm sure others will have comments.
     
  13. Cath.S.

    Cath.S. Senior Member

    Bretagne, France
    français de France
    I tried to suggest a straightforward translation, imho un petit cochon qui sommeille etc. is far too cute.
     

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