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Merci de me confirmer l'envoi de votre message

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by apprendsmoiqqc, Jan 13, 2009.

  1. apprendsmoiqqc Junior Member

    English and Spanish
    Merci de me confirmer l'envoi de votre message....

    This phrase sounds quite odd. What exactly does it mean?
     
  2. cropje_jnr

    cropje_jnr Senior Member

    Wollongong, Australia
    English - Australia
    Please confirm that your message has been sent.

    "Merci de" at the start of a sentence is a common way to formulate a polite request in French. French also frequently uses nouns (envoi) where in English we would almost always use a verb (has been sent).
     
  3. Nicomon

    Nicomon Senior Member

    Montréal
    Français, Québec ♀
    :thumbsup: The French sentence is a little "elliptic", but quite common.

    They could have said more formally : Je vous remercie d'avance de me confirmer l'envoi de votre message.

    Or - and this is closer to cropje's solution : Veuillez s.v.p me confirmer....

    Edit : I just noticed that cropje's answer got longer :)
     
  4. cropje_jnr

    cropje_jnr Senior Member

    Wollongong, Australia
    English - Australia
    Bad habit of mine. :rolleyes:
     
  5. apprendsmoiqqc Junior Member

    English and Spanish
    I understood, "Please confirm that your message has been sent," but that sounds absolutely ridiculous. Does that mean:
    a) confirm your outbox- make sure that the email was sent
    b) send another email to the recipient asking if it was received
    c) confirm receipt of the message that was sent to you
    c) none of the above???
     
  6. Nicomon

    Nicomon Senior Member

    Montréal
    Français, Québec ♀
    I googled the exact sentence "merci de me confirmer votre message" and it turned this page

    So in this specific context, I'd say that the answer is A. Or actually... none of the above.
    He's (roughly) saying that when you send him a first message, you need to confirm sending it, so the system will "unlock it" ... so to speak.

    It may not be "crystal clear", but it is even less so for us as we don't have your full context, as cropje rightly says below.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2009
  7. cropje_jnr

    cropje_jnr Senior Member

    Wollongong, Australia
    English - Australia
    Surely everything would depend on the context (which we haven't heard anything about yet in this thread). The sentence may sound "ridiculous" in context, but without any knowledge of that context, there's nothing about the sentence that makes it sound strange. It is grammatically correct and the literal meaning is clear.

    As an example, is it not possible that the message the speaker wants confirmed will be sent to a third party? Or that the "message" is a letter, rather than an email? We have no way of knowing any of this.
     

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