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  1. stupot

    stupot Senior Member

    Scotland, English
    Word Reference says that 'merdier' = muck up so est-ce qu'on peut dire 'je vais le merdier sans aucun doute!' to mean 'I'm going to muck it up without a doubt!' ? Also I found 'quel merdier' to mean 'what a mess!' is that correct? merci d'avance et je suis désolé si je vous offense.
     
  2. Denis the fatalist Senior Member

    Monaco Monte-Carlo
    France/French
    You're welcome.

    "Quel merdier" = everyday language for ordninary life. No offense.

    je vais le merdier sans aucun doute! = all wrong (merdier is a noun, sans aucun doute is not used in this purpose), You could rather say "je vais bien l'emmerder".
     
  3. stupot

    stupot Senior Member

    Scotland, English
    ah ok so emmerder is a verb in this situation then?
     
  4. marget Senior Member

    Yes, emmerder is an infinitive.
     
  5. xtrasystole

    xtrasystole Senior Member

    France
    Don't be sorry, it's Ok with us. :)

    Denis is right, 'merdier' is not a verb but a noun meaning 'sh*thole', 'f*cking mess'.
    Eg:
    'Range ta chambre ! C'est un vrai merdier !'
    'Quel merdier dans le métro pendant la grève !'
    'Sa femme est partie et il a perdu son travail. Il est dans un beau merdier'.

    The verb is 'merder' meaning 'f*ck up', 'screw up'.
    Eg:
    'Ça a complètement merdé' (it's all f*cked up)
    However, this is an intransitive verb. So you can't say 'je vais merder mon examen' but 'je vais merder à mon examen'.

    To translate 'to muck (it) up', il would suggest instead: 'bousiller', 'esquinter', 'saloper'.
    Eg:
    'Ne lui prête pas ta belle voiture. Il va l'esquinter, sans aucun doute' (he's going to muck it up without a doubt).
    'Ils essayent de bousiller le travail du comité d'organisation' (they are trying to muck up the work of the organization committee).

    On the other hand, the verb 'emmerder' has several meanings but not in the context of your question, I guess.
    Eg:
    'Il m'emmerde' (he pisses me off).
    'Je les emmerde !' (to hell with them!)
    'Je suis vraiment emmerdé, là' (I’m really in the sh*t here)

    Hope it helps
     
  6. Denis the fatalist Senior Member

    Monaco Monte-Carlo
    France/French
    xtrasystole is right I didn't pay attention to "it" (and not him)
     

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