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Mi perro se acurruca para que le haga caricias en el hocico

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Gamen, May 4, 2013.

  1. Gamen Senior Member

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Buenas tardes.
    ¿Cómo podría traducir la siguiente frase en inglés
    Mi perro se acurruca para que le haga caricias en el hocico?

    Mi intento:
    My dog curls up to me /cuddles up to me / snuggles up to me so I can stroke him on his muzzle.

    Aguardo sus sugerencias.
    Gracias.
     
  2. whiz-ard

    whiz-ard Senior Member

    Cali, Valle, Colombia
    Colombian Spanish
    Hola! --

    My dog crouches down to be stroked on its snout by me.

    Saludos.
     
  3. donbeto

    donbeto Senior Member

    Vancouver (Canada)
    Eng(Canada)
    Se me olvidó mencionar "My dog nuzzles up to me ..." Probablemente es lo mejor.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2013
  4. whiz-ard

    whiz-ard Senior Member

    Cali, Valle, Colombia
    Colombian Spanish
    I agree, but that "him" sounds really weird to me, because it's an animal, not a person. By the way, I think muzzle is correct, too. Muzzle/snout/nose/nozzle are interchangeable.
     
  5. echinocereus Senior Member

    English United States
    Hi, Gamen, I think I would say “My dog cuddles or snuggles (these verbs bring warm and loving images to mind) close to me for me to pet him.” Or “so that I may pet him,” but that would sound more formal. One could also add “on his nose or muzzle,” but most pet owners I know do not stop with caressing the nose of their dog. They stroke the head and back as well. I would not likely choose “snout”(although that IS the literal translation of “hocico”) as that brings to mind a pig – NOT that there is anything wrong with a pig. Many people do have them as pets, but I don’t think of a pet dog’s nose as a snout. :)

    And hi, Whiz-ard, Everyone I know who has a beloved pet refers to that pet as he/she, not it because he/she is a living creature and is thought of as a member of the family. :) I’d like to mention too that “nozzle,” so far as I know, is used for the working end of a garden hose. I have never heard it used to refer to a nose of an animal.

    Saludos.
     
  6. Abyssland Junior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish - Spain
    What about "to huddle up". Could it also be a good option, echinocereus?
     
  7. echinocereus Senior Member

    English United States
    Hi, Abyssland, No, I don’t think I would use “to huddle up” in this context. When I think of “huddle,” I see a football team on the field trying to decide their next play. Or dogs could huddle together in some protected area against the cold or while they are napping. Gamen did mention “curls up,” but again I see a dog curling up to take a nap. And Whiz-ard mentioned “crouch down,” but dogs who crouch down may be being intimidated. There are a lot of verb possibilities here, are there not, Abyssland? And often the dictionaries leave us with many questions. :)
     
  8. Abyssland Junior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish - Spain
    You're rignt, echinocereus! One can spend a thousand years trying to learn a language and never get to know those small nuances in meaning. Thanks for sharing :)
     
  9. Gamen Senior Member

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Thank you all of you. Your comments were really interesting!
    So, in conlusion we can say the best options in this context are:
    (he) nuzzles up to me, so I can pet (him)
    (he) cuddles up to me ...
    (he) snuggles up to me
    ...

    On the other hand:
    A dog huddles under a roof or awning to protect himself from cold and rain.
    A dog curls up to settle down and then take a nap.
    A dog croaches down to defend himself from a violent attitude.
    Have I understood correctly?

    Yes, echinocereus, you are right. Pet owners do not caress on the nose of the dog (dog's nose?). They usually stroke him on his head and back. That of "stroking on their snout" was just an example.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2013
  10. echinocereus Senior Member

    English United States
    “Right on!” Gamen. I like your nuzzles, cuddles, snuggles sentences. And the huddles, curls up examples too.

    Your crouches sentence needs JUST a little “tweaking.” Maybe: A dog crouches down to defend himself from the threatening attitude/posture of another dog. He may also crouch down prior to attacking. “Attitude” has a number of meanings in English, among them “a frame of mind” as well as the meaning you were reaching for: a position or posture.


    May I make another suggestion, Gamen? We would say “Pet owners don’t just pet (or – stroke, caress – but pet is the most common verb in this context) their dog’s nose. They usually stroke their dog’s head and back.” (We use “on” in a multitude of places, but not after caress, stroke and pet. Sorry. :) )


    For your “That of stroking on their snout” I would say “That business of stroking, petting their nose, head” etc. “Eso de” and “Lo de” are wonderfully useful in Spanish and I really like them, but, unfortunately, we have to make up other expressions to express that idea, as, for example: that business of, that matter of, etc. “That of” or “those of” are really the equivalent of “el de Pepe” or “los de Pepe” and even in those cases we usually prefer “Pepe’s.”
    As “mi coche y el de Pepe.” “My car and Pepe’s.”

    Gracias, Amigos, por su paciencia. Saludos a todos. :)


     
  11. Gamen Senior Member

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Thank you echinocereus for your complete explanations and suggestions. It is very useful for to learn. Help me to correct my mistakes whenever you participate in any of my posts!
     
  12. echinocereus Senior Member

    English United States
    You're very welcome, Gamen. I enjoyed participating in the discussions on this thread. And I look forward to your suggestions on my Spanish in the future. Most people on WR are very helpful. Have a good day! :) E.
     

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