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Miałabym komu rzucać kijek

Discussion in 'Polski (Polish)' started by Baltic Sea, Nov 6, 2012.

  1. Baltic Sea Senior Member

    Polish
    Hello all users!

    My wife regularly practises Nordic Walking each morning except Sundays. When in our Spa Park, she usually meets a few people with their dogs. Among them is one lady with her dog called Tabs (maybe Taps). She would usually throw a/the stick for him. Because my wife had not seen Tabs for quite a long time, she started to miss him. On one occasion she said to me: I wish Tabs were back. I would have someone to throw a/the stick for.
    Does I would have someone to throw a/the stick for in English mean the same as Miałabym komu rzucać kijek in Polish?
    Thank you. The source: imagination.
     
  2. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    I would say: To throw a stick for. Please be careful -- it can apparently kill the dog, in the worse scenario, or damge his health, at least
     
  3. Baltic Sea Senior Member

    Polish
    Thank you, LilianaB. Does I would have someone to throw a stick for sound good to you?
     
  4. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    I would personally say: I would have someone throw a stick for him. (or her).
     
  5. Baltic Sea Senior Member

    Polish
    Thank you. Is my version undertandable?
     
  6. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Yes, it is understandable, but I personally would not use a regular infinitive here. You could wait for more opinions.
     
  7. Baltic Sea Senior Member

    Polish
    Thank you, LilianaB. I will wait for more comments.
     
  8. Ben Jamin Senior Member

    Norway
    Polish
    Nie rozumiem na czym polega problem. zarówno czasownik dokonany jak i niedokonany można użyć w takim zdaniu, w zależności .od tego, co ma się na mysli
     
  9. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    I think your initial sentence is fine, I think that's what I'd be most likely to say.
     
  10. Szkot Senior Member

    Edinburgh
    UK English
    That suggests you want someone else to throw the stick for the dog, rather than do it yourself.
     
  11. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Yes, but I gather that were we to remove the 'him' bit, it would be just fine, right?
     
  12. Szkot Senior Member

    Edinburgh
    UK English
    No, you need to say 'to throw', as in Mr Sea's original sentence.
     
  13. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Oh, I failed to notice it's missing. Right.
     
  14. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Of sure, definitely. In the second sentence someone else is the person to perform the act of throwing. I thought this was what Baltic wanted in his second sentence -- to express that he will ask, or pay somebody, to throw a stick for the dog. Regarding the infinitive -- what I meant is that I would use a bare infinitive here, rather than a regular infinitive (if we talk about a third party performing the action). Yes, in a constructions I would have someone to talk to, something to do, you definitely need to. I slightly misunderstood his intentions -- I thought, for some reason, it was a new sentence since I answered the part related to the original sentence already and only a part of the sentence was repeated -- only the second clause.

    Doesn't the whole sentence from the original post sound slightly awkward in English? There must be a better way to express this idea in real life. I wish the dog were here so I would have someone to throw the stick for? It is grammtically correct but seems slightly awkward. It might be Ok, in fact, -- just a rare statement.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2012
  15. radosna Senior Member

    Poland
    English- USA
    I think that it would be more accurate to say, "I would have someone to throw a/the stick to." You're not throwing the stick for the dog. You're throwing the stick to the dog.

    Technically, it's not grammatically correct to end a sentence with the word "to" or "for", but not many people would actually say something like, "I would have someone to whom I would throw a stick." More likely, we'd simply say, "I'd have someone to throw a stick to."

    (I hope I haven't misunderstood you. My apologies if I have.)
     
  16. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Yes, I agree. To sounds nicer for some reason -- it implies playing with the dog, rather than just treating him like an object. However, in many articles, mostly British, related to dog injuries as a result of a stick being thrown to/for them, for is mostly used. It may be the BE/AE difference. I would naturally say throw the stick to the dog, but I did not really want to confuse Baltic anymore since for is often used and he speaks BE I think.
     
  17. Baltic Sea Senior Member

    Polish
    Thank you all very much for helpful information. Although I am open to AE, I do my best to try and speak British English properly. I know I am far from perfect.
     

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