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milloin viimeksi herkistyit jouluna

Discussion in 'Suomi (Finnish)' started by Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Feb 8, 2014.

  1. Extra Virgin Olive Oil Senior Member

    Pariisi
    kiina
    I read this magazine article headlined "Milloin viimeksi herkistyit jouluna"?

    What does the question mean?

    When was the last time you were being allergic to Christmas? Or,
    When was the last time you became touched by Christmas?
     
  2. Gavril Senior Member

    English, USA
    I would guess that it means, "When was the last time you became touched by Christmas?", but without more context I'm not sure.
     
  3. Tuuliska New Member

    Helsinki, Finland
    Finnish (suomi)
    I'd say "When did you last become touched at Christmas?" Not by Christmas.

    I feel like there should be a better translation than "become touched", though... I think herkistyä has the feeling of almost being teary-eyed (though not necessarily literally crying)? Although not in the negative sense (I think).
     
  4. akana Senior Member

    English - USA
    Actually, we say on Christmas (see edit at bottom).

    A natural-sounding translation could be:

    "When was the last time you felt touched/moved on Christmas?"

    And of course there are many other alternatives. Perhaps "moved" would be better, since you can say "moved to tears" if needed, whereas you cannot say "touched to tears."

    Edit: As Gavril points out below there is regional variation concerning on Christmas/at Christmas. It also depends on whether you're referring to the season of Christmas or Christmas day.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2014
  5. Gavril Senior Member

    English, USA
    Not me. I'm from the west coast and I say "at" or "during", never "on".
     
  6. akana Senior Member

    English - USA
    Interesting, thanks. In my region (the midwest) it also depends on whether you're referring to Christmas day or the season of Christmas/"Christmas time." I see there is also another WR thread on it here.
     
  7. Gavril Senior Member

    English, USA
    I shouldn't have said that I never use "on Christmas". To be more precise,

    "on Christmas" = "on Christmas day" = joulupäivänä
    "at Christmas" = "during the Christmas season" = joulunaikana

    The point is that I wouldn't use "on" to replace "at", since it means something different.
     
  8. akana Senior Member

    English - USA
    Yes, that's true. I'll edit my post.

    So, can jouluna mean "during the Christmas season" as well as "on Christmas day?"
     
  9. etrade Junior Member

    Helsinki
    Finnish
    "at Christmas" = "during the Christmas season" = joulunaikana = jouluna
     

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