1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

misdemeanor brandishing

Discussion in 'Legal Terminology' started by iheartL&O, Feb 21, 2013.

  1. iheartL&O

    iheartL&O Senior Member

    Dominican Republic
    American English
    Is misdemeanor menacing and misdemeanor branishing the same thing? And how would you say it in Spanish?
    The sentence is: The cops thought it was misdemeanor brandishing, though it was up to the D.A.’s office to decide.
     
  2. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    "Brandishing" normally involves a weapon; "menacing" might only involve your fists.
     
  3. iheartL&O

    iheartL&O Senior Member

    Dominican Republic
    American English
    OK, that makes perfect sense. ¿Alguien sabe como se dice en español: misdemeanor brandishing​?
     
  4. robjh22 Senior Member

    U.S.A. & English
    I would try "la falta de esgrimir una arma."
     
  5. iheartL&O

    iheartL&O Senior Member

    Dominican Republic
    American English
    falta = misdemeanor?

    Creo que esgrimir no funcionará en mi caso, ya que fue una pistola lo que tenia el tipo. Perdon que no le incluí el contexto antes.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2013
  6. RicardoElAbogado Senior Member

    SF Bay Area, California
    American English
    That calls for a legal judgment, not a matter for translation. It will depend on the jurisdiction, the statutes, and the case law. But certainly from an English-language perspective, they are different.

    Blandir means to brandish, not necessarily in the legal sense but the action of brandishing. The legal sense is pretty close to the non-legal sense other than, as Chris K says, the legal usage usually implies a deadly weapon being brandished.
     
  7. iheartL&O

    iheartL&O Senior Member

    Dominican Republic
    American English
    ok, entonces misdemeanor branishing sería = un delito menor de blandir?
     

Share This Page