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  1. No_C_Nada Senior Member

    Castillian - Perú

    Dear Forum members:

    Is the word "missa" originally from Greek or from Hebrew? What's the history of this word?


    Thanks, in advance, for your help.
     
  2. CapnPrep Senior Member

    France
    AmE
    Which word missa? If you mean the Latin word for "Mass", see the following thread:
    Ite missa est
     
  3. No_C_Nada Senior Member

    Castillian - Perú

    Thank you, CapnPrep, for the link. I read it and also the link to the Catholic Encyclopedia. And I still do not know whether the first language where this word appeared was Hebrew or Greek.
    Was it ever used in Hebrew?
     
  4. berndf Moderator

    Geneva
    German (Germany)
    I don't understand what you mean. Missa in Ite missa est is obviously Latin, pure and simple.
     
  5. apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    It is not a Greek word, it derives from the proclamation in the Latin mass "ite, missa est" and it is a Latin word.
    In Greek the equivalent is the concluding words of the Liturgy «ἐν εἰρήνη προέλθωμεν» (let us depart in peace)
     
  6. francisgranada Senior Member

    Slovakia
    Hungarian
    I think the question is about mass (< missa) as "Gottesdienst", "eucharistic service", "celebración de la eucaristía" etc. The word "missa" in this sense exists in many languages, e.g. Sp. [santa] misa, It. [santa] messa, Hung. [szent] mise, Czech mše [svatá] ... I myself have also read about a possible (but not clear) Hebrew origin (from "mashah" ... or somethig similar) of the Latin "missa", independently on the meaning of the phrase "Ite missa est".
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2012
  7. berndf Moderator

    Geneva
    German (Germany)
    Those are all Roman-catholic dominated languages. In German, e.g. you would never-ever say "Messe" for a protestant service. And as apmoy70 said, there is nothing similar in Greek. I should think the word is originally Roman Catholic.

    "Mashah" exists in Hebrew and Aramaic. If means "to draw out of the water" in Hebrew (Mosheh, Moses, means "the one drawn out of/rescued from the water") and in "to cleanse one's face" in Aramaic. I can't imagine there is any connection. That should be folk etymology.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2012
  8. francisgranada Senior Member

    Slovakia
    Hungarian
    I agree and I'd like to add a little precison: the usage of the terms mass, Messe, missa etc... seem to me "language-independet" but "religion-dependent". E.g. a protestant service is not called "mise" neighter in Hungarian nor in Czech and Slovak.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2012

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