1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

modern Greek conditions

Discussion in 'Ελληνικά (Greek)' started by jlang14, Jun 29, 2013.

  1. jlang14 New Member

    English
    How do you form conditions (if questions) in Greek?

    As an example, here are some sentences for translation:

    If I eat food, I am not hungry

    If I ate food, I wouldn't be hungry

    Thanks
     
  2. libreal New Member

    GREEK
    The verb "πεινάω" and the expression "είμαι πεινασμένος" have the same meaning.


    If I eat food, I am not hungry
    Αν τρώω φαγητό δεν είμαι πεινασμένος.
    or
    Αν τρώω φαγητό δεν πεινάω.



    If I eat, I will not be hungry
    Αν φάω, δεν θα είμαι πεινασμένος ή δεν θα πεινάω.



    Second and 3rd conditionals are the same

    If I ate food, I wouldn't be hungry (now)
    Αν είχα φάει φαγητό, δεν θα ήμουν πεινασμένος (τώρα)
    or
    Αν είχα φάει φαγητό, δεν θα πεινούσα (τώρα)



    If I had eaten food, I wouldn't have been hungry (then/yesterday).
    Αν είχα φάει φαγητό, δεν θα ήμουν πεινασμένος (τότε/χθες)
    Αν είχα φάει φαγητό, δεν θα πεινούσα (τότε/χθες)
     
  3. BrendaP Senior Member

    Canada
    Canada, English
    Keeping in mind that πεινασμένος is the masculine form of the adjective. If you're a female, it would be πεινασμένη.
     
  4. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    "If I ate food I wouldn't be hungry." For example: "If I ate food (regularly) I wouldn't (ever) be hungry".
    I'd say "Αν έτρωγα δεν θα πεινούσα" (or "δεν θα πείναγα").
     
  5. Αγγελος Senior Member

    Greek
    The short and oversimplified answer to your question is "much as you do in English".
    The full answer would take up a whole chapter of any book on Greek syntax.
    Very briefly:
    The equivalent of 'if' is αν or εάν. The conjunction άμα can also be used instead, but it can also mean 'when'.
    If your condition is something that may turn out to be true, you use the same tenses in both the conditional clause and the main clause as you would in two independent sentences, except that the θα particle that goes into making the future tense is usually omitted after the conditional conjunction. Examples:
    Αν έφυγε με το τρένο των 10, θα φτάσει στις 5. (said between 10 am and 5pm)
    Αν [θα] φύγει με το τρένο των 10, θα φτάσει στις 5. (said before 10 am)
    Αν είναι σήμερα ή αύριο στην Αθήνα, ας μου τηλεφωνήσει.
    If the condition is contrary to fact or impossible to realise, we use the imperfect in the conditional clause and θα + the
    imperfect in the main clause. We may (but don't have to) use the pluperfect instead to stress that we are referring to the past. Examples:
    Αν ήμουν πλούσιος, θα αγόραζα σπίτι στη θάλασσα (but I am not rich).
    Αν είχε φύγει με το τρένο των 10, θα ήταν εδώ τώρα (but he didn't leave on the 10am train)
    Αν έφευγε με το τρένο των 10, θα ήταν εδώ τώρα (same meaning)

    As to your specific examples, they sound somewhat unnatural to me. One would be more likely to say
    Άμα έχω φάει, δεν πεινάω (=If I have eaten, I am as a rule not hungry)
    Άμα φάω, δεν θα πεινάω (=If I eat in the near future, I will not be hungry later)
    Αν είχα φάει, δεν θα πεινούσα (=If I had eaten earlier, I would not have benn hungry now; but I have had nothing to eat and so am hungry)

    Hope this helps!
     

Share This Page