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Moglie e buoi dei paesi tuoi

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by simcog87, Mar 28, 2010.

  1. simcog87 Senior Member

    Manchester, United Kingdom
    Italian-Elba Island : Spanish-Colombia,
    Hello!
    Does anybody know what is the English equivalent for this Italian expression:
    "Moglie e buoi dei paesi tuoi"
    It means that everyone has to get married with a person from their own country and work in their own country.
    Thank you in advance
     
  2. tranquilspaces

    tranquilspaces Senior Member

    Honestly, kind of a strange concept to me as an American. We are such a young country, and composed almost entirely of immigrants. I can't think of anything....
     
  3. Blackman

    Blackman Senior Member

    Island of Sardinia, Italy
    Italiano/Sardo
    E' un detto profondamente Italiano, dubito che esista perfino il concetto in Inglese.
     
  4. raizpat

    raizpat Senior Member

    Torino, Italy
    Italian
  5. simcog87 Senior Member

    Manchester, United Kingdom
    Italian-Elba Island : Spanish-Colombia,
    Thank you very much!
     
  6. tranquilspaces

    tranquilspaces Senior Member

    Never heard of this before, but the general sense I get from this expression in English is not so much that you should marry within your own country and culture... it's more like an admonition to know what you're getting into so you don't have any unpleasant surprises later. Is that the sense in Italian too?
     
  7. Blackman

    Blackman Senior Member

    Island of Sardinia, Italy
    Italiano/Sardo
    Yes Shannon. That is exactly the right meaning.
     
  8. Murphy

    Murphy Senior Member

    Sicily, Italy
    English, UK
  9. raizpat

    raizpat Senior Member

    Torino, Italy
    Italian
    Very likely! But also in Italy, at present we don't have all those oxen... :)
     
  10. simcog87 Senior Member

    Manchester, United Kingdom
    Italian-Elba Island : Spanish-Colombia,


    Ah ok! Good to know!! :thumbsup::)
     
  11. tranquilspaces

    tranquilspaces Senior Member

    I would just like to mention that in addition to never hearing this expression before today, I also have no clue what a mixen is. :)
     
  12. Murphy

    Murphy Senior Member

    Sicily, Italy
    English, UK
    I'm not surprised, Shannon. Neither had I, but if you're really interested, it appears to be a word from Old English meaning "dunghill";):D. See this helpful link from "answers.com" http://www.answers.com/topic/mixen
     
  13. tranquilspaces

    tranquilspaces Senior Member

    Hilarious! Is this supposed to be a proverb or a joke? ;)
     
  14. rrose17

    rrose17 Senior Member

    Montreal
    Canada, English
    What about the horrid (It's better to) "stick to your own kind"? Is that the same sort of feeling?
     
  15. tranquilspaces

    tranquilspaces Senior Member

    Better the devil you know than the devil you don't!
     
  16. tranquilspaces

    tranquilspaces Senior Member

    Not sure about this one, Rose... I think of this (yes, agreed, horrid) slur as something people direct at those who are different from them, not to members of their own group. More of a "get away from us." Do you agree?
     
  17. rrose17

    rrose17 Senior Member

    Montreal
    Canada, English
    I don't know. I think it could be used either way.
    WHy don't you stick to your own kind? Get away from my people. (said the prospective mother-in-law to the "foreign" girl whom her son had taken up with.)
    But also
    You'll only find heartbreak with her. It's better to stick to your/our own kind. (said the mother to her son.)
     
  18. Dragoncella Junior Member

    Italian
    Buondì,
    qualcuno saprebbe dirmi se "it's better to marry over the mixen than over the moor" usato per tradurre il detto italiano "moglie e buoi dei paesi tuoi" è attuale, cioè comprensibile anche oggi. O esiste un modo migliore per tradurlo?
    Grazie
     
  19. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Mai sentito in vita mia!:D Sono quindi andata a cercarlo.

    Qui dicono che sia comune nel Cheshire (ma non a Londra, evidentemente:)), detto però così:
    Better wed over the mixen than over the moor

    Poi in Scozia:
    Better over the midden than over the muir

    Ed ecco qui delle altre versioni da "A Dictionary of Proverbs".;)

    Non mi viene in mente nulla di più moderno, sorry.;)
     
  20. Tunalagatta Moderator

    Blighty
    English - England
    Come london calling, mai sentito prima - è molto antiquato e dubito che c'è molta gente che lo conoscirebbe o capirebbe oggi.
    Se questo è il vero senso di "Moglie e buoi dei paesi tuoi" (fino ad oggi ho sempre pensato che fosse un'espressione razzista ...) direi semplicemente, "Know what you're letting yourself in for/getting yourself into [before making an important decision]".
     
  21. Kishu

    Kishu Senior Member

    Florence
    Italy - Italian
  22. Matrap

    Matrap Est Mod In Rebus

    Abruzzo, Italy
    Italiano
    Kishu, il secondo link è puro inglese maccheronico, traduzioni fatte con evidenti fini comici...:)
     
  23. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
  24. Kishu

    Kishu Senior Member

    Florence
    Italy - Italian
    Ciao,
    ebbene sì, le traduzioni mi sembravano piuttosto maccheroniche e me ne avete dato conferma :)
     
  25. Mary49

    Mary49 Senior Member

    Padova
    Italian
    What about birds of a feather flock together (che però in realtà è più vicino a "Chi si assomiglia si piglia") ? or choose a bird from your own backyard ? Fonte: http://ita.proz.com/


     
  26. MR1492

    MR1492 Senior Member

    Bowie, MD
    English -USA
    My thoughts on this one. I sooooo agree with Matrap about the "mechanical translation" issue. Those are so bad they look like I did the translating! :D

    The other page appears to do a reasonable job of getting the ideas translated and not just the words.

    I think Mary's suggestion is pretty good but not quite spot on. I don't remember a saying quite like "Moglie e buoi dei paesi tuoi" in AE although my father always insisted that I should marry a "good Italian girl!"

    Phil
     
  27. rrose17

    rrose17 Senior Member

    Montreal
    Canada, English
    And to paraphrase Dorothy from the Wizard of Oz "(For your heart's desire) don't look any further than your own backyard."
     
  28. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Hey Phil!:D

    Matrap and I said inglese maccheronico* (macaroni-style!:D:D) , not meccanico (mechanical).;)

    Did you take your dad's advice and marry a good Italian girl, by the way? :)

    @Rrose: Don't look any further than your own backyard I like.:) It gets the idea across much better than all the "mixen" versions (which I think all of us had to look up, right?), because it's readily understandable.

    *What do you think we could call bad Italian spoken/ written by native speakers of English?:D But don't aswer that...we're already OT with this one.:):
     
  29. mflcs Junior Member

    Illinois
    American English
    What a fantastic reference to deadmanwriting! Mille grazie, Kischu.
     
  30. Tonino Burato New Member

    italian
    Better the devil you know than the devil you do not know is the most appropriated one by streets ahead
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2013
  31. Matrap

    Matrap Est Mod In Rebus

    Abruzzo, Italy
    Italiano
    Ciao Tonino e benvenuto :)

    Maiuscole, punteggiatura e parole scritte in modo completo sono un optional? :D
     

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