1. tatis Senior Member

    USA
    Spanish, México
    En varias ocasiones me he visto en la necesidad de traducir "morboso" del español al inglés.

    Según el DRAE, el significado que busco es:
    Que manifiesta inclinación al morbo.

    Y morbo es el interés malsano por personas o cosas.

    En el siguiente contexto, ¿cómo se traduciría morboso? ¿Hay alguna palabra en inglés que signifique lo mismo o hay que definirlo?

    (Encontré "morbid" pero o no parece ser una palabra de uso común aquí para decir morboso.)

    Contexto: -¿Hay material pornográfico en su casa?
    -Sí, pero mi hijo no lo ve, él no es nada morboso.
     
  2. aurilla Senior Member

    Puerto Rico
    Am Eng/PR Spanish
    morbid: suggesting an unhealthy mental state; "morbid interest in death"; "morbid curiosity"
     
  3. aurilla Senior Member

    Puerto Rico
    Am Eng/PR Spanish
    "morboso" en inglés es "morbid"

    Ej. "He has a morbid sense of humor." (Ël tiene un sentido de humor morboso".)
     
  4. DCPaco Senior Member

    Planet Earth
    Spanish of Mexico/ English of the USA
    A mí parecer, morbid es la única palabra para traducir "morboso"...bueno, quizá también "morbose".

    Morbid, adj.

    1. a. Causing disease; characteristic of, indicative of, or produced by disease; of the nature of disease; of or relating to disease.

    2. Of a person, mental state, etc.: characterized by excessive gloom or apprehension, or (in later use) by an unhealthy preoccupation with disease, death, or other disturbing subject; given to unwholesome brooding.
     
  5. Mirlo

    Mirlo Senior Member

    Missouri
    Castellano, Panamá/ USA
    puedes usar uno de los sinónimos:

    pernicioso,-a adjetivo pernicious

    Pero, yo si he escuchado "morbid" creo que es la que se usa más.
    saludos,
     
  6. willardandkurzt Senior Member

    Santiago Compostela
    Spain Spanish, Galician
    Yes but I think "morboso" at least as it is used nowadays in Spain has many different senses so its translation is quite tricky.
    It could be translated as "sick" in many cases. for instance a "sick taste for violence or death" or "pornography images"
    In other contexts, I think it translates better as "kinky" . And surely there are more nuances.
     
  7. aurilla Senior Member

    Puerto Rico
    Am Eng/PR Spanish
    Es cierto, sin embargo, "sick" es más coloquial o slang.
     
  8. DCPaco Senior Member

    Planet Earth
    Spanish of Mexico/ English of the USA
    I think you are looking for something like: vile, depraved, vitiated, etc.
     
  9. Filis Cañí Senior Member

    The hills
    Triana, caló
    Kinky?

    Y olé.
     
  10. aurilla Senior Member

    Puerto Rico
    Am Eng/PR Spanish
    Also,
    morose: dark: showing a brooding ill humor; "a dark scowl"; "the proverbially dour New England Puritan"; "a glum, hopeless shrug"; "he sat in moody silence"; "a morose and unsociable manner"; "a saturnine, almost misanthropic young genius"- Bruce Bliven; "a sour temper"; "a sullen crowd"
     
  11. willardandkurzt Senior Member

    Santiago Compostela
    Spain Spanish, Galician
    Sorry but I don't see that there is a connection between "morboso" and "morose"
     
  12. Mirlo

    Mirlo Senior Member

    Missouri
    Castellano, Panamá/ USA
    'Tatis'
    Yo creo que así está bien. Bueno pero al traducirlo podrías usar "he does not have an "unhealthy mind"
    saludos,
     
  13. tatis Senior Member

    USA
    Spanish, México
    Well, I received a lot of help.

    In these past few minutes, I had a chance to talk with a couple of LCSW (Social Workers -English speaking) who do these kind of interviews in which these kind of questions are asked, and "morbid", from what they say, is not the term they'd use.

    Apparently "kinky" or "vile" would be more referring to an adult, not so much to a young adolescent. So... I keep thinking, and I am sure grateful for all your answers. It seems that for a young child it would be something like "unhealthy curiosity" (in pornography, in this case).


    Tahnk you again.
     
  14. Filis Cañí Senior Member

    The hills
    Triana, caló
    Creo que está definiendo al 99% de la población masculina adolescente como morbosa e insana.
     
  15. Filis Cañí Senior Member

    The hills
    Triana, caló
    -¿Hay material pornográfico en su casa?
    -Sí, pero mi hijo no lo ve en nuestra presencia, él no es nada indiscreto.

    (Vaya padres.)
     
  16. gotitadeleche Senior Member

    Texas, U.S.A.
    U.S.A. English
    deviant or perverted. But these also would be for an adult showing definite pathological behavior. I agree that for a young child "unhealthy curiosity" or "unhealthy interest" are better choices. In your example sentence I would just say "Yes, but my son doesn't look at it. He is just not interested at all in that kind of thing." (this would be casual, coloquial speech)
     
  17. willardandkurzt Senior Member

    Santiago Compostela
    Spain Spanish, Galician
    Well, on second thoughts, in this particular context, a less literal translation could do

    "my son is not into it"

    As Filis Cañi makes clear, it a rather awkward situation to imagine. But if they discuss porno so openly this matter-of-fact translation might do the trick.
     
  18. tatis Senior Member

    USA
    Spanish, México
    Mil gracias.
     
  19. Filis Cañí Senior Member

    The hills
    Triana, caló
    On the other hand, if a parent chooses to use a word such as vile or kinky in relation to his son, who are we to censor it or try to make it more p.c.?
     
  20. tatis Senior Member

    USA
    Spanish, México
    Absolutely, I agree with you, and I wonder what terms they would use to say "vile" or "kinky" in Spanish.

    There was another case in which a person used "sátiro", a completely new word for me. Luckily, it was in my handy dicionary:

    sátiro: a) (Mit)satyr; b)(hombre lascivo) (fam) sex maniac (colloq); (violador) (RPI fam) rapist, sex fiend (journ)

    Much worse...
     
  21. willardandkurzt Senior Member

    Santiago Compostela
    Spain Spanish, Galician
    I am not sure it is much worse. Of course it depends on the context as always. But "sátiro" can be used with multiple nuances. Sátiro is very common tongue-in-cheek. It lends to multiple interpretations like "morboso" which could be "vile" "kinky", little pervert" and many others. Dictionaries are not to be taken to literally.
     
  22. Filis Cañí Senior Member

    The hills
    Triana, caló
    La verdad es que morboso se suele usar coloquialmente con un significado mucho menos negativo que el expuesto hasta ahora:

    ---Juan y yo tenemos muchos problemas.

    ---¡Cuéntame todos los detalles!

    ---Uy, ¡qué morboso que eres!
     
  23. gorbax3 New Member

    Ireland English
    estoy de acuerdo; en españa, morboso = kinky
     
  24. Varelita New Member

    USA, English & Spanish
    Morboso does not under any circumstance mean “morbid”. Morbid in English refers to death in one way or another. Morboso refers to a non-traditional way or desire to engage in a sexual act with your partner. “Kinky”, which is a slang word in English, meaning sexual activities beyond the so called “norm”, is probably the closest translation for morboso, it might refer to “S & M” sexual activity as well. It certainly refers to a-not-so-common sexual craving or act. There are three common forms of the word in Spanish; “morboso (masculine form of the word) – morbosa (feminine form of the word) – mobosamente” (a state of “kinkiness”). I have been called morbosa many times for the mere fact that I really enjoy sexual activity with my man, in stereo, hi-fi, high definition, and with all the audio/visual effects. LOL Just use protection and enjoy a healthy sexual relationship with the one you love. God not only created us to have sex just to bare children (be fruitful and multiply), but I believe His intentions were for us to receive pleasure from it as well. Be well, behave, and God bless.
     
  25. adult1956 New Member

    USA, English
    I have read this word in many gay site profiles. In this context in Latin America and in Spain it means "kinky".
     
  26. tatis Senior Member

    USA
    Spanish, México
    Gracias. Después de todo este tiempo vuelvo a ver mi post inicial en el que hice la pregunta y di el contexto. Dentro de esecontexto específico, ¿sería "kinki" la palabra adecuada? Yo creo que no... si se trata de un niño o joven que tiene simplemente una curiosidad extrema por material pornográfico, por ejemplo, mas no ha tenido relaciones sexuales necesariamente.

    Este niño/joven, ¿sería "kinki"? Es "morboso" (en español) por la naturaleza del tema que absorbe su curiosidad. ¿Cómo decirlo en inglés...?
     

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