1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

mother-in-law's tongue

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by Encolpius, Aug 10, 2008.

  1. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    I was surprised more nationes use the same word for that plant. Do you use the same word for that flower?? What do you call it in your language?

    Hungarian = anyósnyelv (lit. mother-in-law's tongue)

    Czech = tchynin jazyk (lit. mother-in-law's tongue)


    http://www.fiskars.com/images/HU/150150_11.gif
     
  2. sokol

    sokol Senior Member

    Vienna, Austria; raised in Upper Austria
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    Via Wikipedia I found out the Latin name of it (Sansevieria), and German Wiki claims that the name Schwiegermutterzunge, meaning literally the same in German, indeed does exist as a variety for this genus.

    Personally however I haven't heard that name, ever - so I can't tell you if it is a rather common one or not.
     
  3. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    a little bit interesting the neigbours don't know that plant. I think the name is from German.
     
  4. Nizo Senior Member

    In Esperanto, the plant is called sanseviero, from the Latin. Haven't heard of another name for it.
     
  5. sokol

    sokol Senior Member

    Vienna, Austria; raised in Upper Austria
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    Well you know personally I am more one for wild plants, not domesticated ones. ;) (Or at least I think it isn't a native plant to Austria.)

    So me not knowing this one might not be very significant.
     
  6. mimome New Member

    St. Petersburg
    Swedish
    It's called mother-in-law tongue in Swedish as well : Svärmors tunga
     
  7. Mahaodeh Senior Member

    Arabic and English
    In Iraq, they call it Halq el-sabi' حلق السبع (lion's mouth)
    In Palestine they call it tum el-'asad تم الأسد (lion's mouth also, using alternative words)
     
  8. Frank06

    Frank06 Senior Member

    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,

    In Dutch it's even more mysogynistic: Sansevieria trifasciata is called 'vrouwentongen' (women's tongues).

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     
  9. Juri Senior Member

    Koper, near Trieste
    italian/Slovenia
    Italian: Sanseveria or lingua di suocera
    Slovenian: taščin jezik or Laurentijeva Sansevierija .
    The plant from Agavaceae family was brought from Afrika by Raimondo di Sangrio, the seventh prince of SanSevero, born 1710.
     
  10. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    very nice Juri, but what do those words mean??? :confused:
     
  11. sokol

    sokol Senior Member

    Vienna, Austria; raised in Upper Austria
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    It is of course - in Slovene - also "mother-in-law's tongue", Encolpius ;) while the other version of course is following the Latin name.
     
  12. Hakro

    Hakro Senior Member

    Helsinki, Finland
    Finnish - Finland
    In Finnish: anopinkieli - literally mother-in-law's tongue.

    The reason for the name is obvious: the leaves of the plant are long and sharp.
     
  13. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    حلق is "throat," isn't it?
     
  14. OldAvatar Senior Member

    Bucharest
    Romanian
    Romanian has it too, but it is a different sort of cactus (Opuntia humifusa):
    limba soacrei
     
  15. Mahaodeh Senior Member

    Arabic and English
    Yes, but in Iraqi collequal they also use it as mouth.
     
  16. Rallino Moderatoúrkos

    Ankara
    Turkish
    In Turkish it's: Paşakılıcı (lit. Pasha's sword)



    In Turkish, there is the plant Aslanağzı (Lion's mouth), but it's different.
     
  17. ahmedcowon Senior Member

    In Egypt, it is called جلد النمر geld en-nemr (tiger's skin)


    The same in Arabic, Hanak as-sab' حنك السبع (lion's mouth)
     
  18. apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    In Greek:

    «Σανσεβιέρια» [sansevi'eri.a] (fem.).
    Never heard it as mother-in-law's tongue, which when translated in Greek is «γλώσσα της πεθεράς» ['ɣlossa tis peθe'ras]
     
  19. vianie Senior Member

    Slovak
    Then, Slovak term is a combination of these ones :) svokrin jazyk
     
  20. Maroseika Moderator

    Moscow
    Russian
    In Russian it is called:
    тёщин язык (mother-in-law's tongue)
    змеиная кожа (snake's skin)
    щучий хвост (pike's tail)
     
  21. AutumnOwl

    AutumnOwl Senior Member

    Sweden
    Swedish - Sweden, Finnish
    It's also known as bajonettlilja (bayonet lily) in Swedish.
     
  22. L'irlandais

    L'irlandais Senior Member

    Dreyeckland/Alsace region
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Sansevieria trifasciata is also called "snake plant" in English.

    Native to Southern Nigeria to West Central Tropical Africa.
    It was originally cultivated as Bowstring Hemp, at a time when bows and arrows still had a military application here.

    It also appears that "dumb-cane" or "tuft-root" is known as mother-in-law's tongue plant, thoiugh it's an entirely different species (Dieffenbachia seguine)
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2013
  23. oveka Senior Member

    Ukrania, ukraniano
    In Ukrainian it is called:
    Сансев’єрія
    тещин язик
    щучий хвіст
    сансев’єра
     
  24. AutumnOwl

    AutumnOwl Senior Member

    Sweden
    Swedish - Sweden, Finnish
    It's the Sansevieria that's the mother-in-law's tongue in Sweden.

    The Diffenbachia is known as prickblad (dotted leaves) here.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2013

Share This Page