1. Elisabeth36 Junior Member

    Geneva
    Switzerland, french-speaking
    Hello !

    I am not sure I understand well the expression "mount evidence of..."

    Does it mean "donner des preuves", "chercher des preuves" or "fabriquer/inventer des preuves" (donc des fausses preuves) ?

    Context:
    "Mounting evidence of serious election fraud has helped to ignite violence throughout Kenya"

    but I thought that "mouting" was a verb so I put the infinitive form...
    Is "mounting" a noun ?

    Thanks

    Eli
    Moderator's note: two threads have been merged to create this one.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2013
  2. ChiMike Senior Member

    Chicago USA
    USA, English
    This is an older use of the verb: mount, which, when used at all (as a verb) is now used in the verbal phrase:

    "mount up"
    How my debts mount up!

    It means "to increase" (literally: to go up: monter)

    les preuves s'accumulent

    We also have the expression: "a mountain of evidence"
     
  3. Babelutte Junior Member

    French - Belgium
    Hello all !

    Could you help me translate "mounting evidence" in this sentence : "But now mounting evidence suggests it is a real and growing problem." Would it be correct to say : "Il y a de plus en plus de raisons de penser que le problème..." ?

    Thank you.
     
  4. bousval New Member

    French
    "Il y a de plus en plus de raisons de penser que le problème est réel et croissant" is the perfect word-for-word translation. But it is a little "heavy". I would suggest : "Les raisons de penser que le problème est réel et croissant sont de plus en plus nombreuses."
     
  5. akaAJ Senior Member

    New York
    American English, Yiddish
    "raisons" is a lot more general than the English "evidence". "L'évidence qui ne cesse d'augmenter montre ..."
     
  6. Babelutte Junior Member

    French - Belgium
    Thanks a lot !
     
  7. djara

    djara Senior Member

    Sousse, Tunisia
    Tunisia Arabic
    Careful! Eng. "evidence" and Fr. "évidence" are false friends (faux amis). They look alike but don't mean the same thing. While "raison" does not translate "evidence", "raison de penser" does, in this context.
     

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