1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

Movable vs moveable

Discussion in 'English Only' started by miatamaniac, Jun 11, 2008.

  1. miatamaniac New Member

    Germany
    Dutch - Netherlands
    Hello!
    Whereas I'd write moveable, I am confronted with movable in the phrase "...and form a movable connection.".
    Both seem to be considered correct. Is either of them BE/AE or has movable become accepted over the years?
    What do native speakers reckon?

    Thanks in advance!
    Miatamaniac
     
  2. Esca Senior Member

    Hmm, I think I would only write "movable." "Moveable" seems a bit odd to me, but doesn't disturb me as much as, say, "comeing." (!!!)
     
  3. xqby

    xqby Senior Member

    Santa Maria, CA
    English (U.S.)
    "Moveable" is shown as a variation in the dictionaries, but it strikes me as being common only because people tend to tack on the "-able" suffix without properly changing the verb stem. I too would write "movable."
     
  4. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    Me too. I think moveable is chiefly British.
     
  5. gasman Senior Member

    Canada, English
    I have only used the "moveable" form, but I checked, and it seems either form of the word is accepted. I would suspect that the loss of the "e" is an American introduction along the lines of the absent "U" in many words.
     
  6. Matching Mole

    Matching Mole Senior Member

    England, English
    The (big) OED favours movable and appears to have done so for some time, it also seems to avoid stating outright that moveable is a current alternative, despite this nearly all of the recent usage examples (in BE) quoted by the dictionary spell it moveable. The smaller versions of the OED allow moveable as a variant.

    Collins (British) gives both spellings in the headword section, with movable first.

    I don't think that movable is a US introduction as very old British spellings lack the "e", but moveable seems to be widely used in the UK.
     
  7. miatamaniac New Member

    Germany
    Dutch - Netherlands
    Thanks a lot for your contributions! So both seem to be correct anyway. I'll just let my mood decide the spelling then :rolleyes:.
     

Share This Page