1. georgiaomally Junior Member

    London/Oxford, England
    English, England
    Hola al foro

    Estoy leyendo “La Casa Verde” de Vargas Llosa y varias veces he encontrado la palabra “muñequear” o “muñequearse” en un contexto que no tiene sentido con las definiciones del DRAE. Me parece una frase coloquial - un ejemplo del contexto es una conversación entre un grupo de muchachos bastante borrachos:

    “--¿Qué pasa, colega? -- dijo Josefino -- No te muñequees.”

    ¿Hay alguien peruano que pueda ayudarme?

    Muchas gracias, y ¡por favor, corríjanme el español!
    :)
     
  2. Arrius

    Arrius Senior Member

    Spain
    English, UK
    .
    Está en el DRAE donde se menciona el uso en Chile también:

    muñequear.

    (De muñeca).


    1. tr. Arg., Bol., Chile, Par. y Ur. Mover influencias para obtener algo. Este asunto ha salido porque lo he muñequeado. U. t. c. intr.

    2. intr. Esgr. Jugar las muñecas meneando la mano a una parte y a otra.

    3. intr. Chile. Dicho del maíz o de otra planta semejante: Empezar a echar la muñequilla.

    4. intr. Hond. Ostentar, aparentar.
     
  3. georgiaomally Junior Member

    London/Oxford, England
    English, England
    Ya lo sé - encontré las mismas definiciones en el DRAE, pero todavía no entiendo lo que significa la frase en el contexto de la novela - por favor, ¿puede usted explicarlo? Mil gracias :)
     
  4. Arrius

    Arrius Senior Member

    Spain
    English, UK
    You know the situation in the novel in which this incident occurs; I, at least, haven't read this particular book of Llosa's. What's going on here?
     
  5. georgiaomally Junior Member

    London/Oxford, England
    English, England
    It's quite hard to know exactly what's going on as the different narratives intersect and as they start to weave together it's revealed that the characters appear in different 'threads', which seem to be set at different points in time. But here, one of the guys has just returned to Piurna after being taken prisoner in another country, and his friends have just told him that a woman (the relationship between them being as yet unexplained, but they seem to have been a couple / involved with each other at some point) has become a prostitute since he left. Drunk and seemingly devastated by this news, he insists on going to the brothel where she (presumably) works, and his friends try to distract and dissuade him.
    (sorry, this is very long-winded!)
    So in that context, I thought "No te muñequees" would be something along the lines of 'don't be like that' but the DRAE definition doesn't support that at all! I thought maybe it was a Peruvian saying or slang, but perhaps I'm just reading it wrong or didn't quite get the definitions in the DRAE. What do you think?
    Thanks for all your help! :D
     
  6. Arrius

    Arrius Senior Member

    Spain
    English, UK
    It would seem to me that the basic idea is of manipulating, pulling on and/or twisting the strands of the "silk" on the maize cob (from which various artefacts are in fact made), so using a similar idiom in English, I would say: "Don't get so wound up about this - leave it alone" (i.e. stop analysing and fretting about the situation). Note that "fretting" also derives from the idea of weaving strands:"fret from O.Fr. frete "interlaced work, trellis work,"
    Perhaps some kind South American may confirm this, or not, as the case may be.
     
    Última modificación: 26 de Septiembre de 2008
  7. georgiaomally Junior Member

    London/Oxford, England
    English, England
    Brilliant, thanks so much :)
     
  8. Fantasmagórico

    Fantasmagórico Senior Member

    Montevideo, Uruguay
    Uruguayan Spanish

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