1. gonzo New Member

    Spanish and Spain
    Could anyone help me in translating this bit: "Renforcer et mutualiser les capacités de formation et de recherche"? I can't think of any equivalent to "mutualiser" in English. Thanks.

    Moderator note: multiple threads merged to create this one
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 7, 2009
  2. Kaioxygen

    Kaioxygen Senior Member

    England
    England, English
    equalise, make even?
     
  3. edwingill Senior Member

    England English
    to share among members (of the team)?
     
  4. tregenza Senior Member

    UK
    English
    what about 'reciprocate"?
     
  5. doodlebugger Senior Member

    France
    Pooling resources?
     
  6. gonzo New Member

    Spanish and Spain
    Thank you for your help. Cheers!
     
  7. Erestor New Member

    Winter Park FL
    France / Français
    Bonjour,

    In banking can you translate "mutualiser les besoins en trésorerie " by " to aggregate cashflow requirements" ? or there is another way to formulate it?

    thanks in advance for your help
     
  8. SwissPete

    SwissPete Senior Member

    94044 USA
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    Larousse : MUTUALISER Faire passer un risque, une dépense à la charge d'une mutualité, d'une collectivité.

    Je ne comprends pas « mutualiser les besoins en trésorerie ». :confused:
     
  9. Moon Palace

    Moon Palace Senior Member

    Lyon
    French
    It means that the needs for cash will be gathered together (those of different agencies or different branches of the same firm), but I fall short of supplying the adequate English verb... :eek:
    Maybe 'congregate'?
    This new trend goes along with that of outsourcing specific tasks to some firms so as to save money. Gathering some tasks or some needs or equipment allows savings too. Hope it is clear.
     
  10. clairet

    clairet Senior Member

    London & Bordeaux
    England & English (UK version)
    I think only animals (inc humans) can "congregate" in English. "Aggregate" was a better word, but seems to lack the sharing aspect needed. In another thread on "mutualiser", doodlebugger proposed "pool(ing) resources". Here, maybe "pooling requirements" would work.
     
  11. Moon Palace

    Moon Palace Senior Member

    Lyon
    French
    Thanks, Clairet, yes indeed, 'pool' is an excellent word for the intended meaning.
     
  12. Erestor New Member

    Winter Park FL
    France / Français
    Thank you all for the help. I will certainly go with "Pool" which seems the right word.
    Thanks again
     
  13. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    yes, to pool risks, pool resources is the right term here.
     
  14. George French Senior Member

    English - UK
    In Britain we have mutual societies that are for the common good of all its members.

    I therefore suggest that a translation could be:-

    "Strenghthen and combine the training and research capabilities."
     
  15. Albert 50 Senior Member

    Montreal QC and Dallas TX
    Canada: French and English (bilingual)
    Bonjour à tous,

    The verb "mutualiser" is a "neologism" that cannot yet be found in most dictionaries. Le sens de "mutualiser" est de "mettre en commun" (to pool) et de partager (to share). I noticed it being used a few years ago primarily in material produced by the European Common Market representatives, who used it to refer to the "pooling" of knowledge, methods and expertise provided by the various European couontries, as they worked together toward integration and a certain level of unity.

    I'm not sure who coined the verb but it also began to appear a few years ago in English (to mutualize) with the same meaning. You can also find it in Spanish now (mutualizar) especially in papers and documents translated from French affecting the European Spanish-speaking population.

    You may, or may not, choose to use neologisms that suddenly appear as a result of the evolution of modern society and language. For better or for worse, Google shows that it is more or less entrenched in formal documents with an administrative tone, especially in Europe. I have never seen it used in Canada in either of our two official languages (English or French). It seems to be primarily a Eueropean "invention" and corresponds to the need to "pool and share" expertise and systems, as Europe continues to integrate it's infrastructure.


    Cordialment
    Albert
     
  16. George French Senior Member

    English - UK
    Albert (& others).

    Your comments about new words are absolutely correct. Unfortunately it seems to be embedded into English (EN/US & the rest) culture to enrich (sic) our language experience (sic). That's why we need these forums to try to find out what it all means.
     
  17. chrizo

    chrizo Senior Member

    Burkina Faso
    Mooré
    Bonjour à tous,
    SVP, je ne sais pas si c'est mon anglais qui fait défaut mais je n'arrive pas à trouver un équivalent de ce mot français "mutualistion" dont je doute de l'origine.

    Par exemple dans " il faut mutualiser les équipements du centre de formation pour les apprenants des autres filières de formation " je traduis par

    " there must be a common use of the equipment of the vocational training center for trainees from other trades"

    Existe t-il un équivalent anglais pour ce mot? J'ai fouillé tous mes dictionnaires et ceux en ligne mais rien.
     
  18. w0lverine

    w0lverine Senior Member

    The equipements need to be gathered ? Ou shared, dans ce contexte ?
     

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