My "former" lecturer [professor]?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by minigun, May 18, 2011.

  1. minigun Junior Member

    New Zealand
    Chinese - Mandarine
    I still keep contact with a lecturer from college after I graduated.
    How to refer to her in writting or conversation? My "former" lecturer? I'm not sure if it is right, it sounds strange.
    Thanks.
     
  2. ribran

    ribran Senior Member

    Austin, Texas
    English - American
    "A former lecturer/professor" is appropriate and idiomatic.
     
  3. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    It sounds like you want to know how to address her. If so, you simply call her what you've always called her: Dr. Ching, Miss Ching, Ms. Ching, Mrs. Ching, Professor Ching, etc. Then if she would like you to call her something else, I'm sure she'll tell you. (So start with formal first.)

    Edit: Seeing ribran's answer and reading your question again, perhaps you want to know how to refer to her in conversation or writing with others -- in which case, I agree with ribran: my former lecturer/professor. Or you can use "Dr. Ching, my former lecturer/professor" and then use Dr. Ching after that.
     
  4. ribran

    ribran Senior Member

    Austin, Texas
    English - American
    I thought I would add that it is fairly common to refer to all college-level instructors as professors, even if they do not have tenure.
     
  5. minigun Junior Member

    New Zealand
    Chinese - Mandarine
    I didn't make it clear in my question, yes I'd like to know how to refer to her in conversation with others, as "I heard about it from my former lecturer".
    But it's good to know how to address her too.
    Thanks you guys.
     
  6. minigun Junior Member

    New Zealand
    Chinese - Mandarine
    Is that a convention in America? Good to know.
    I'm in New Zealand, we just address college instructors by their names, even if they are actually professors. They ask students to do that because it sounds more casual.
     
  7. ribran

    ribran Senior Member

    Austin, Texas
    English - American
    It's informal, not a convention. I refer to lecturers as professors unless I feel the need to be precise. Students at the graduate level are often on a first-name basis with their instructors, but undergraduates, who generally have little interaction with their professors, usually use "professor" or "doctor" when addressing them.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2011
  8. Thomas Tompion Senior Member

    Southwest France
    English - England
    A lot depends on who you are talking with. In BE it would be common in informal circumstances to talk about my old lecturer. Old there would carry the force of former, and not necessarily the warmth of old in very BE expressions like old chap. It wouldn't suggest he was very aged either, unless you were too.
     
  9. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Lecturer has been the generic term in BE; I think that is still true. Yes, in conversation, like TT I would talk about my old lecturers or possibly my lecturers at university/uni. In more formal situations my former lecturer sounds fine. If you want to address the person, I second Copyright in suggesting that you use the term you used when you were a student, and let the person suggest something else if she wants to.
     
  10. Parla Senior Member

    New York City
    English - US
    Welcome to the forum, Minigun!

    I believe you are talking about referring to the person, not about addressing him or her.

    Here in the US, we'd say, "my college history professor" or, if we are quite a long time out of college, "my old college history professor".
     
  11. Thomas Tompion Senior Member

    Southwest France
    English - England
    Minigun was specific about referring to the person. Talk about language suitable for addressing them only started in the third post in the thread.
     
  12. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    Just to clarify, people who are called lecturers, readers and so on in the UK (and similar) are referred to as (assistant, associate, full) professors in the US. People who are called Professors in the UK are usually department heads/chairpersons in the US.
    (Surprised to find no threads with "professor lecturer" in the title here at WR!)
     
  13. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Useful comment, JS: I'll change the title of this thread to read my "former" lecturer [professor]:)
     
  14. ribran

    ribran Senior Member

    Austin, Texas
    English - American
    What is the British equivalent of an American lecturer?
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2011
  15. minigun Junior Member

    New Zealand
    Chinese - Mandarine
    In my college (in NZ) we have lecturer, senior lecturer, associate professor and professor. Usually the professor is the Head of Department, but sometimes a senior lecturer can also be the HoD.
     
  16. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    They are still lecturers. There isn't a distinction in title for those with tenure and those without at this level.

    EDIT: Just remembered that there's a difference in pay scale, so this are 'A Scale' Lecturers and 'B Scale' Lecturers.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2011

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