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My name is Maximus Decimus Meridius

Discussion in 'Lingua Latina (Latin)' started by Epilio, Apr 23, 2009.

  1. Epilio

    Epilio Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain
    Hi :)

    I'm trying to translate a memorable quote from Gladiator. Here is:

    And my translation:

    It's wrong?.

    Greetings ;)
     
  2. Fred_C

    Fred_C Senior Member

    France
    Français
    Nomen mihi est Maximus Decimus Meridius, praefectus Exercituum Borei, Praefectus Legionum Felicum, fidelis minister veri imperatoris Marci Aurelii. Pater filii occisus estoccisi, coniux uxoris occisa estoccisae. Et consequam consequar (vel assequar) meam ultionem in hac vita aut postera.
     
  3. Epilio

    Epilio Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain
    Thank you ;)

    Consequar is passive, isn't it?. Why do you use the passive mood instead of the active one?. Its translation is I will be reached/achieved (Je serai obtenu/atteint (?)) if I'm not wrong. Shouldn't be consequetur in utilizing the passive mood (my vengeance will be achieved)?.
     
  4. brian

    brian Senior Member

    Montréal
    AmE (New Orleans)
    They both come from the verb sequor, "I follow," which is deponent. That means it looks passive (acts like a passive verb), but has an active meaning.
     
  5. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    As Brian says, sequor looks like a passive verb and is conjugated as a passive verb. To expand a bit, the fact that it is active in meaning means that it can take a direct object; in this way a deponent is unlike a passive verb.
     
  6. Epilio

    Epilio Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain
    Ok. I checked it out through verbix, but I guess they erred (well, this is not the first time they conjugate wrongly) or maybe me.

    Thanks ;)
     
  7. brian

    brian Senior Member

    Montréal
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Ah, no--it should be conjugated like a passive verb. See here.

    In fact, that site even conjugates sequor wrong. I suppose the program simply follows a paradigm--and gives all theoretically sound possibilities--and it's up to you to know whether the verb is deponent or not.
     
  8. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    For verbs that have both active and passive forms, such as amo, both forms are in dark black. For deponent verbs, the active forms are light gray and the deponent (passive) forms are black. I suspect that this is supposed to indicate that the active forms in gray do not actually exist, but this is the pattern they would follow if they did. They include the active forms as a model for other similar verbs that do exist in both active and passive voices.

    If that is their system, it would be better to note it on the page.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2009
  9. brian

    brian Senior Member

    Montréal
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Ah you're right. Good eye!
     

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