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never mind, I don't mind

Discussion in 'Deutsch (German)' started by Linni, Jun 30, 2006.

  1. Linni Senior Member

    Czech Republic; Czech
    How would you translate these sentences into German?
    1. I don't mind it.
    Did you mind it?
    2. Never mind.


    + I am already used to it. = Ich bin daran schon gewohnt. ? <= is it correct? (I am sure it isn't)
    By the way, did I write at least the English sentences correctly?
     
  2. flame

    flame Senior Member

    Austria
    German-Austria
    1) Es macht mir nichts (aus)
    Hat es dir was (aus)gemacht
    2) Macht nichts!

    + bis auf den Umlaut ist es perfekt!
    Ich bin daran schon gewöhnt.
     
  3. Linni Senior Member

    Czech Republic; Czech
    aha... wohnen => gewohnt, sich gewöhnen => gewöhnt ... now I understand.

    Hat es dir was (aus)gemacht <= why "was"? Can it be translated as "anything" or something with this meaning?
     
  4. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    You could translate "was" literally, but I don't think it would help.

    You could use "ausmachen" with the idea of "amount to", for a literal and somewhat "Denglish" translation:

    Has it to you something amounted to?
    Has it "amounted to something" for you?

    Those are, of course, VERY strange.

    Did it make a difference for you/to you?
    Was it important to you?
    Did you care?
    Did you mind [it]?

    I think in this example you would be best off simply memorizing the German phrase. :)

    Gaer
     
  5. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    "was" is the colloquial short form of "etwas".
     
  6. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    I think Linni knows this, which is why we saw this:

    Can it be translated as "anything" or something with this meaning?

    That is why I suggested something literal, as a half-way point.

    Has it "amounted to something" for you? = Did you mind? :)

    Gaer
     
  7. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    Achtung! "Never mind" very rarely, if ever, corresponds to "Macht nichts" (at least in American English). Using "never mind" to mean "I don't mind; it's ok with me" is a mistake I've come across quite frequently among foreign speakers of English.

    "Never mind" actually means "forget it" or "let's drop it," so I'd translate it as "vergiss es" or "lassen wir es" (other suggestions welcome).

    Mod Note: Linni, please remember not to post more than one question per thread.
     
  8. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    Elroy, I agree with you. Are familiar with this?

    "That don't make no never mind." This is regional slang and means:

    "That doesn't matter."

    Caution: The above expression is non-standard American English, so keep that mind.

    One possible explanation of the confusion is that both "macht nichts" and "never mind" are both said with so many voice inflexions and in so many situations that there is an overlap in which they might mean the same thing—but rarely, as you said. :)

    Gaer
     
  9. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    No, I was not familiar with that particular expression. Sounds very non-standard. :)

    I guess in this case the meaning does correspond more or less to "macht nichts."
     
  10. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    Oh yes! VERY non-standard, but very colorful. It would be immediately undstandable by all people in certain areas of the southern US. I spent four years at FSU, which is in Tallahassee and just barely south of Georgia. I don't think it would be understood in all parts of the US, and certainly not in other English-speaking countries. :)

    Gaer
     
  11. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    You are right. I often come across the meaning you described, but I couldn't remember. :eek:

    I'd translate it as "Egal!" or "Ist egal".
     
  12. Linni Senior Member

    Czech Republic; Czech
    Thank you for all your replies! It really helps me a lot.
    I just have one, quite unsubstantial question:

    If "was" is the colloquial form of "etwas", does it mean I should (in formal texts) use rather "etwas"?

    Hat es dir was (aus)gemacht.
     
  13. Iche New Member

    German Germany
    You can, and should use 'etwas', even in an informal context it sounds good.

    As a shorter form of 'etwas', I only know it as part of a question, anyway:

    Hast Du Dir was zu Essen gekauft?
    Hast Du Dir was gebrochen?
    Bist Du in was hineingetreten?
     
  14. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Really? So you'd consider these sentences incorrect?

    Ich habe mir was wehgetan.
    Ich will mir schnell was kaufen gehen.
     
  15. Henryk Senior Member

    Germany, German
    Ich sehe das anders. "was" kann man generell für "etwas" nehmen. Ich als Berliner würde beim "Dialekteln" niemals "etwas" nehmen, sondern immer nur "watt". "Etwatt" gibt's nicht.

    Wieso soll immer alles inkorrekt sein? Hier geht es um informellen sprachlichen Stil, da gibt es kein Falsch und kein Richtig - entweder klingt etwas in Ordnung in jemandens Ohren okay oder nicht.
     
  16. Iche New Member

    German Germany
    Sorry, you're right, that is a possible use, too. But I would always use:
    Ich habe mir wehgetan.
    Ich gehe (schnell) einkaufen.

    And there is also a small diffference between Ich habe mir was wehgetan. and Ich habe mir etwas wehgetan.
    was -> something
    etwas -> just a little
     
  17. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Ich weiß. :)

    Aber dennoch würde ich "etwas" in dieser Situation gar nicht verwenden, sondern entweder "ein bisschen/'n bissel" oder gar nichts.
     
  18. Iche New Member

    German Germany
    Weiß ich. ;) War auch mehr für alle nicht nativen Sprecher.

    Dito.
     
  19. Kajjo

    Kajjo Senior Member

    Deutschland (Hamburg)
    German/Germany
    Elroy, could you please give some situations in which we could use "Never mind!" correctly. I think, Americans use "Never mind!" much more often than Germans use "Vergiß es!" or "Ist egal!". So, I am not sure about the correct idiomatic translation.

    Kajjo
     
  20. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Let me suggest three situations I often come across:

    A: So, what do you think about my new style?
    B: New style? What do you mean? Your hair, fashion, or what?
    A: Oh, never mind! Seems you haven't noticed it.

    A: Do you know "Alexander Klaws"? It's one of those "Germany Idol" winners. Do you like his songs?
    B: No, I don't. Do I have to know him?
    A: Nope, you don't. But I thought you knew some of his songs.
    B: No, I don't know any of them.
    A: Ok, never mind then.

    A: Can you help me?
    B: No, I don't have time now.
    A: Well, never mind, I'll get it done anyway.

    I think we could use "ist egal" in all of these three situations, whereas "schon gut" is possible inthe last one only.
     
  21. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    All good examples! :thumbsup:

    Kajjo, does that make it clear, or would you like some more examples? I'd be happy to provide them if so, because as you said the expression is used very frequently in American English.
     
  22. Kajjo

    Kajjo Senior Member

    Deutschland (Hamburg)
    German/Germany
    Danke für die Beispiele. Dann stimme ich Euch zu, daß im Deutschen "Ist egal" und "Schon gut!" recht gute Übersetzungen wären (außer daß in Beispiel 2 "schon gut" eher nicht paßt), manchmal auch "Vergiß es!", obwohl das je nach Umfeld und Intonation etwas rüde klingen kann.

    Kajjo
     

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