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no debe haber ido nadie a la reunión

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by mrmz, Mar 7, 2013.

  1. mrmz New Member

    Spanish
    En la frase "no debe haber ido nadie a la reunión", teniendo en cuenta que no es una prohibición, sino deducción negativa que en inglés se expresa con "can't"...deberíamos utilizar este modal en negativa, pero tampoco podemos tener dos negaciones en inglés...deberíamos por tanto decir con el modal en positivo : Nobody can have gone to the meeting? Nobody must have gone to the meeting ( aunque no transmita obligación)?
    Gracias
     
  2. Radrook Senior Member

    USA
    English American/Spanish Caribean
    Nobody could have gone to the meeting.
    Esa es la manera que yo lo expresaria.
     
  3. cset Senior Member

    French, Español
    "can" o "could" son contrasentidos.

    "Nobody must have gone to the meeting" es la forma correcta, con la misma implicación de que se deduce que nadie ha ido.
     
  4. Julvenzor

    Julvenzor Senior Member

    Sevilla
    Español propio (Andalucía, España)
    Buenas, aprovecho la circunstancia para informarlo/la de que existe un modo muy sencillo de expresar "deducción negativa" en español (así no tiene que aclararlo):

    No debe de haber ido nadie a la reunión.


    Aunque se admite no usar la "de". Esto es lo esctrictamente correcto:

    Deber ==> Prohibición.
    Deber de ==> Suposición.

    Un saludo.
     
  5. L'Inconnu Senior Member

    US
    English
    To me, the word 'could' implies possibility. If nobody could, than it was impossible. 'Must' is more of a supposition.

    'The hall is still dark over there. Nobody must have shown up. But, I made sure the room was available. So, they could have gone to the reunion, if they had wanted to.'
     
  6. RicardoElAbogado Senior Member

    SF Bay Area, California
    American English
    "There can't have been anybody who went to the meeting" is also possible.
     
  7. Radrook Senior Member

    USA
    English American/Spanish Caribean
    I never claimed that "could" and "can" have equivalent meaning.
     
  8. srb62 Senior Member

    Scotland
    British English
    I can't speak for everywhere, but very typical for 'round here' would be,as you suggest, both:
    "Nobody must have gone to the meeting"
    and
    "Nobody can have gone to the meeting."
     
  9. RicardoElAbogado Senior Member

    SF Bay Area, California
    American English
    And:

    There must not have been anybody who went to the meeting.

    To me, starting with "There + verb" is more natural than starting with Nobody + supposition. "Nobody goes there" (an affirmative statement) is perfectly natural, but with supposition involved, such as "Nobody must have" or "Nobody could have" it just sounds less natural.
     
  10. srb62 Senior Member

    Scotland
    British English
    For me, anything sounds a little 'odd' with 'anybody'/'nobody' - though I'm not sure why.
    Whereas "he can't have been at the meeting" sounds completely natural, "nobody can have been at the meeting" does, I agree, sound a little clumsy.
     
  11. RicardoElAbogado Senior Member

    SF Bay Area, California
    American English
    I suspect that statements like "Anybody can do it" or "Nobody knows" don't sound odd to you. I think it is because, as I mentioned, these are affirmative statements, and having "anybody" or "nobody" as the subject is not an issue. But my theory is that when you have "anybody" or "nobody" as the subject and the statement is conjectural, it sounds odd. Perhaps someone will give us a better answer.
     

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