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no obstante/ sin embargo

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Carudaru, Sep 18, 2006.

  1. Carudaru

    Carudaru Junior Member

    Mexico City
    English & Swedish, Sweden
    I have a question for the native Spanish speakers.

    I know that NO OBSTANTE and SIN EMBARGO both mean HOWEVER. But, is there even a slightest difference in connotation between the two? Are there situations/contexts when you would use one rather than the other?
     
  2. arellaca Senior Member

    Spanish Mexico

    Hi!

    I am a native Spanish speaker. "No obstante" and "sin embargo" are very close synomyms. So near, that the RAE defines "sin embargo" as:

    "Sin embargo = No obstante, sin que sirva de impedimento" (from the RAE diccionary)

    The RAE uses one to define the other one, this means that they are very close synonyms as no other words can be.

    Both mean "however" as you have correctly stated.

    Hope this comment helps you

    Regards

    Carlos Oscar

    PS "No obstante" may be more literary, whilst "sin embargo" is more of the every day use.
     
  3. pejeman

    pejeman Senior Member

    [

    Carlos Oscar

    PS "No obstante" may be more literary, whilst "sin embargo" is more of the every day use.[/quote]

    Hola:

    And legal. It is often used in written contracts and agreements: "No obstante lo anterior..." (In this case I understand it means "Notwithstanding the former")

    Saludos
     
  4. arellaca Senior Member

    Spanish Mexico
    Hola:

    And legal. It is often used in written contracts and agreements: "No obstante lo anterior..." (In this case I understand it means "Notwithstanding the former")

    Saludos[/quote]

    You're absolutely right.

    If you check the word "obstante" latin root, it means "obstacle", hence "no obstante" literarily means "without obstacle". In your legal example, what you are meaning is something like "even though the former might represent an obstacle it is not, so....", both in English and in Spanish.

    As stated, since "no obstante" is more literary, the legal jargon prefers it too.

    Curious as it may seem, "sin embargo" means exactly the same. You can substitute "no obstante" with "sin embargo" in your legal example and the phrase shall keep its meaning, but you would not find it since it is not the prefered terminology

    Regards

    Carlos Oscar
     
  5. jehenu New Member

    I know in english do exist a difference between nevertheless and however. Could somebody explain it to me plz?
     
  6. Juana Brienza

    Juana Brienza Senior Member

    Argentina. Capital federal
    argentino-inglés
    Yo tiendo a traducir nevertheless como "a pesar de...". Pero no soy nativa y es cierto que es sinónimo de however y también es "no obstante" o "sin embargo".
    Esperemos que los nativos nos esclarezcan.
     
  7. grubble

    grubble Senior Member

    South of England, UK
    British English
    Hello jehenu and welcome to the forum!

    The main difference is that however has more meanings, e.g. it can mean comoquiera.

    Example

    However hard you try you will never be able to kiss your own elbow." :tick: (comoquiera)

    Nevertheless hard you try you will never be able to kiss your own elbow." :cross: (no obstante)
     
  8. jehenu New Member

    thank u so much. I thought until now, that one was more formal than the other and one had a more negative connotation...
     
  9. Akali New Member

    Buenos Aires
    Español
    Hello, I use the Spanish "nevertheless" as a "possibility" as is "however."
    Both in everyday language are not used, since it is a fairly formal way of speaking that only I use at work.

    Eg "What about going to the movies, however, we could go to dinner." (No Obstante=also is a way that indicates a future action)
    Eg "What about going to the movies, I have little money, however I would also go to dinner" ("Sin embargo = implies here more a wish than a reality).

    No obstante:
    1. Proposition: In Spite of
    2. Conjunction: However, nevertheless, notwithstanding, nonetheless

    Sin embargo:
    1. Adverb: though-all the same-just the Same
    2. Conjunction: However-but-nonetheless nevertheless notwithstanding-still-



    But in the legal connotation different results as Pejeman posting, which is correct.


    Hola, yo en español uso el "no obstante" como una forma de "posibilidad" igual que "sin embargo".
    Los dos en el lenguaje corriente no se utilizan, ya que es una manera de hablar bastante formal que solo utilizo en el trabajo.

    Ej. "Qué tal si vamos al cine, no obstante, podríamos ir a cenar." (No obstante=igualmente, es una forma que indica una acción futura)
    Ej. "Qué tal si vamos al cine, no tengo mucho dinero, sin embargo me gustaría ir también a cenar" ("sin embargo= implica aquí más un deseo que una realidad).

    No obstante:
    1. Preposición: in spite of
    2. Conjunción: however-nevertheless-notwithstanding-nonetheless

    Sin embargo
    1. Adverbio: though-all the same-just the same
    2. Conjunción: however-but nevertheless- nonetheless- still- notwithstanding
    Final del formulario



    Pero en la connotación legal se traduce diferente como posteo Pejeman, que es correcto.

     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2011

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