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No siree

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Antonio, Apr 2, 2005.

  1. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    Hi Group,

    What does "No siree" means? and in what context can I say this phrase?
     
  2. lsp

    lsp Senior Member

    NY
    US, English
    No siree and Yes siree are just ways to accentuate the response. Very casual usage only.
     
  3. JLanguage Senior Member

    Georgia, US
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    The phrase that sticks out in my mind is, "No siree Bob"
    I personally have never said that phrase and do not intend to use it in the near future.
     
  4. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    In what specific cases, do you recommend to use this phrase? I guess probably, when you're emphasizing something? Is rude to say it, in front of people you don't know?
     
  5. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English
    No siree is not necessarily rude, it's just very informal. I say it to my kids (students) occasionally, just to be funny. It's just an add on to the word no.
     
  6. mjscott Senior Member

    I think that "No, siree," and "Yes, siree," "Yessiree," and "Yes, siree, Bob" are all casual way of saying, "You better believe it!"

    You would think that it was a derivation of, "Yes, sir," and "No, sir," --which are respectful ways to answer someone--but the terms are not thought of as particularly respectful ways of answering someone, but casual-type answers.

    John Steinbeck is the first known author that I know of to use, "Yessiree," often in dialogue in his books.
     
  7. JLanguage Senior Member

    Georgia, US
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    There's no need to use it. It's really not at all commonly used anymore, if it ever was popular in the first place. If you really want to use it, I suggest the following context:

    "So, Antonio, were you at that party the other night?"
    "No siree", I was home studying."
    Although I would say:
    "Naw man", I was freaking studying . (Very Colloquial, Don't use except among good friends. Possibly offensive.)
     
  8. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    Hi Jlanguage,

    What does "Naw man" and "I freaking studying" mean? (Very Colloquial, Don't use except among good friends. Possibly offensive.)
     
  9. mjscott Senior Member

    "Naw man" and "I was freaking studying"

    "Nosiree!" I was f***ing studying!"
     
  10. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    Teenagers say more often "Naw man" or adults say it also?
     
  11. JLanguage Senior Member

    Georgia, US
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    It's more teenage slang. Teenagers often tend to colloquialize (yea, I made a new verb) speech to an extent that adults usually avoid in order to sound intelligent rather than moronic.
     
  12. Apus Senior Member

    Confederatio Helvetica French
    and don't forget "Yessireema'm" !:D
     
  13. VenusEnvy

    VenusEnvy Senior Member

    Maryland, USA
    English, United States
    I always thought that "No, siree" was derived from, "No, sir". Now, it seems to be a colloquial phrase.

    "Have you seen Amber since she went on vacation last summer?"
    -"No, siree!"

    "Do you plan on doing all of your homework tonight?"
    - "No, siree!"



    "Naw" is a more colloquial way of saying, "No".
    "Naw, man" is a more colloquial way of saying, "No, man".

    "Do you wanna go to the movies tonight?"
    - "Naw, man. I havta baby-sit my little sister."

    "Did you get to finish taking the test before class ended?"
    -"Naw, man. I couldn't finish the last page."
     
  14. garryknight Senior Member

    Kent, UK
    UK, English
    And "Yessireebob"!
     

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