Nominal sentence coordination جملة اسمية

Discussion in 'العربية (Arabic)' started by Bilbo Baggins, Jun 29, 2011.

  1. Bilbo Baggins

    Bilbo Baggins Senior Member

    Manhattan, NY
    American English
    Hello,

    I know that Arabic omits the verb "to be" in the present indicative. Further, I know that to create a nominal sentence that links definite nouns (nouns with the definite article) with adjectives we place the adjective into indefinite nunation along with proper case, gender, and number. For example,
    السَاعَةُ نَظِيفةٌ
    "The clock is clean."

    However, what if I want to link two nouns nominatively in the indicative present? Would I use the same paradigm? For example, would الطَبِيبُ رَجُلٌ mean "The doctor is a man." ?

    Further, what if I want to link two definite nouns together nominatively in the present indicative? What if I wanted to say: "The man is the doctor." Would I say: الرَجُلُ الطَبِيبُ ?
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2011
  2. clevermizo Moderator

    St. Louis, MO
    English (USA), Spanish
    Yes, that's correct

    The idiomatic way to say this is:
    الرجل هو الطبيب
    Which literally in English would be parsed as "[As for] the man, he is the doctor" but which simply means "The man is the doctor."

    الرجل الطبيب I don't think would be parsed as a complete sentence, but I'm not sure the rule about this.
     
  3. Bilbo Baggins

    Bilbo Baggins Senior Member

    Manhattan, NY
    American English
    Interesting. You actually insert the personal pronoun in between the two definite nouns. Thanks.
     
  4. AlJaahil Junior Member

    Vancouver
    Canadian English
    The rule I learned was that if you are coordinating a definite nominal with a definite predicate noun, you always break up the sequence by inserting a pronoun or the predicate will be read as a modifier, especially with adjectival predicates. E.g. supposing you were comparing two houses of different sizes and ages, and wanted to say that "the big one is the new one."

    Without the pronoun inserted, الكبير الجديد al-kabiiru 'l-jadiid would mean simply "the new big one." To convey the desired meaning you have to insert the pronoun: الكبير هو الجديد al-kabiiru huwa 'l-jadiid.
     
  5. Bilbo Baggins

    Bilbo Baggins Senior Member

    Manhattan, NY
    American English
    If I just wanted to say: "He is the doctor" would I just omit the "The man" part?

    Thanks.
     
  6. clevermizo Moderator

    St. Louis, MO
    English (USA), Spanish
    Yes, you can just say هو الطبيب.
     
  7. Mahaodeh Senior Member

    Arabic and English
    Yes, that's correct, you would say: هو الطبيب.
     
  8. AlJaahil Junior Member

    Vancouver
    Canadian English
    Yes, هو الطبيب is perfectly correct. You can also say إنّه الطبيب, innahu 'T-Tabiib if you want to sound elegant and formal.
     
  9. Ibn Nacer Senior Member

    French - France
    It's a good question, a very interesting topic.

    In some cases, it seems it is not mandatory to insert "a pronoun of separation" between mubtada and khabar.

    Read this thread : هذا البيت
     
  10. Bilbo Baggins

    Bilbo Baggins Senior Member

    Manhattan, NY
    American English
    What if I wanted to link two indefinite nouns together in a nominal sentence? For example, is there a way to say "A man is a doctor" ?

    Thanks.
     
  11. إسكندراني

    إسكندراني Senior Member

    أرض الأنجل
    عربي (مصر)ـ | en (gb)
    That English sentence could mean any of:

    There is a man who is a doctor
    يوجد رجل طبيب - هناك رجل طبيب - من الرجال طبيب - إلخ

    Part of being a man is to be a doctor
    الرجل طبيب - من الرجولة أن تكون طبيب

    All men are doctors / every man is a doctor
    كلّ رجل طبيب - كلّ الرّجال أطبّاء
     

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