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Nominative subject and accusative subject?

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by Paula83, Jun 8, 2011.

  1. Paula83

    Paula83 Senior Member

    Argentina- Español
    What is the difference between nominative and accusative subjects?. I know that nominative subjects are those like: His house is green and accusatives are those like: She is beautiful. Or is it viceversa? Could you explain it in an easy way please?, with simple words?.
    Thanks in advance.
    Paula
     
  2. Paula83

    Paula83 Senior Member

    Argentina- Español
    It is VIceversa, I think :p
     
  3. kayokid

    kayokid Senior Member

    Chicago
    English, USA
    Hello. As far as I know there is no such thing as an 'accusative subject'. I understand it this way: The nominative case is the case of the subject. The accusative case is the case of the direct object.
    His house is green has a noun as the subject/in the nominative case.
    She is beautiful has a pronoun as the subject/in the nominative case.

    In the sentence, I see the man, I (a pronoun) is the subject/in the nominative and the man, a noun, (the direct object) is in the accusative case. If you substitute a pronoun for 'the man' you would have: I see him, and the only thing that changes is that, him (a pronoun) is the direct object (in the accusative case).
     
  4. Agró

    Agró Senior Member

    High Navarre
    Spanish-Navarre
    Podría referirse a esto:

    I told her to come at 3.00.

    her es objeto, y por tanto acusativo, del verbo told, pero a su vez es sujeto (nominativo) del infinitivo subordinado, ya que quien hace la acción de venir es ella (her).
     
  5. FromPA

    FromPA Senior Member

    Philadelphia area
    USA English
    "Her" is the indirect object, answering the question "to whom?". "To come" is the direct object, answering the question "what?".
     
  6. SevenDays Senior Member

    Spanish
    The problem with I told her to come at 3.00 is that you can't easily separate "her" from "to come" and call the former "indirect object" and the latter "direct object," even though they answer the traditional questions "to whom?" and "what?" "Her" is the subject of the infinitive "to come," and they should remain together. (Because "her" is in the accusative case, it's called the accusative subject.) That's why some call "her to come" the object of "told." By comparison, the indirect and direct objects show up more clearly in They offered him a reward, where the two objects are clearly differentiated. The accusative subject also occurs in constructions such as For him to sing would be a mistake, where "him" is the subject of the infinitive "to sing" and is introduced by "for." Of course, the subject of the sentence is For him to sing.

    Cheers
     
  7. FromPA

    FromPA Senior Member

    Philadelphia area
    USA English
    I know from my old high school grammar book, which I still refer to after 40 year, that the subject of an infinitive takes objective case. So I agree with your analysis, but it still seems to me to be an equally valid analysis to view this construction as "I told her (IO) something (DO)," with the something in this case being "to come."
     
  8. Paula83

    Paula83 Senior Member

    Argentina- Español
    Thank you very much, Now, I understand much better :)
     

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