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non avevano dei marmocchi da accomodare

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by CephasInRome, Dec 10, 2012.

  1. CephasInRome

    CephasInRome Senior Member

    Rome (Cinecittà), Italy
    English-United States
    Still hoping someone will come up with an alternative (or a way to couch it in better phrasing) to the options found so far on WRef, Thesaurus (for 'kids'), for 'marmocchio'.

    Text:
    "A loro andava bene così, non avevano dei marmocchi da accomodare ed organizzavano tutte le loro giornate."
    (A mother with kids, in recounting her summer vacation (in a brochure for a touristic village) tells of her friends whom she met at this village, and who had no children.)

    Found so far: rug rats, brats (not good, too negative), rascals, youngsters...

    The woman's own children seem to be anywhere from 4-11, perhaps, judging from the rest of the text.

    Thanks!

    Peter
     
  2. rrose17

    rrose17 Senior Member

    Montreal
    Canada, English
    What about pipsqueaks? Although I think rug rat sounds cute, too.
     
  3. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    Hi ron - I disagree about "rugrats" sounding cute. I think it's rather offensive. There's always "small fry" but in this context, none of these sounds very good. You could just say "little ones" - They had no little ones... etc.
     
  4. rrose17

    rrose17 Senior Member

    Montreal
    Canada, English
    Hi Joan, you're probably right about the rugrats, I was thinking in a conversation it would sound ironic but in a brochure it might come off as offensive.
     
  5. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Kiddies, tadpoles, bairns, offspring?:)
     
  6. CPA Senior Member

    Rome
    British English/Italian biling
    Kiddiwinks, little 'uns, young'uns? :)
     
  7. CephasInRome

    CephasInRome Senior Member

    Rome (Cinecittà), Italy
    English-United States
    Yes, I think considering the above, "little ones" is the best solution. No risk of misunderstanding or offense, and it's simple enough and affectionate.
    Thanks to all,
    Peter
     

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