non c'entra niente

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by cartaplus, Jul 31, 2006.

  1. cartaplus

    cartaplus Senior Member

    Dubai
    italian
    Salve a tutti!
    Quale espressione in Inglese coincide a: "Non centra niente!" oppure "Ma che centra?" che si usa quando il nostro interlocutore risponde una cosa per un'altra alla nostra domanda!
    Grazie a quanti mi aiuteranno.
    Ciao
     
  2. pescara Senior Member

    Connecticut
    English-USA
    Direi:
    That has nothing to do with it.
    OR
    What does that have to do with it?
     
  3. Necsus

    Necsus Senior Member

    Formello (Rome)
    Italian (Italy)
    I'd say:
    'Non c'entra niente' = That is neither here nor there.
    'Ma che c'entra?' = What's that got to do with it?
    but wait for mothertongues. ;)
     
  4. DAH

    DAH Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    USA/California--English
    I sometimes say: But, that was not my question. Necsus's suggestions are often used.
     
  5. ElaineG

    ElaineG Senior Member

    Brooklyn NY
    USA/English
  6. WordsWordWords Senior Member

    Piemonte, Italy
    Am English
    Hi everyone,

    Adding to this old thread.

    I'd just like the confirmation that "non c'entra" could mean "doesn't matter" or "isn't important". The sentence I'm translating is:

    Il nostro lavoro si interesserà soltanto alle tensioni muscolari croniche; e il busto, per così dire, non c’entra.

    My attempt so far:

    Our work will only concern the chronic muscle tension; the corset, as it were, is not important/does not matter.

    (The context is a text on massage and well-being and the patient in question is a very old woman who does not want to part with the corset she has been wearing for 40 years...)

    Thank you!
     
  7. MR1492

    MR1492 Senior Member

    Bowie, MD
    English -USA
    WWW,

    You have the essence but I'll make some minor recommendations to make it a little more colloquial.

    Phil
     
  8. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    I like your attempt Phil , bar the will not be affected part.;) Non c'entra here means does not come into it, has nothing to do with the work we will be doing, is of no importance here.;)
     
  9. WordsWordWords Senior Member

    Piemonte, Italy
    Am English
    Hi Phil,

    Thank you for your input (and the modifications). Maybe I should have given more context. The original sentence is excerpted from a sequence in which the doctor explains what he and the patient will be trying to do to alleviate problems due to years of bad posture -- the corset needs to be removed to do this and so I think "will not be affected" is not appropriate in my case because it seems to imply that she will keep it on during treatment.

    Edit: Hi Jo, crossed posts with you! :)
     
  10. MR1492

    MR1492 Senior Member

    Bowie, MD
    English -USA
    WWW,

    You are correct. I thought that the woman would wear the corset during the treatment. My mistake. Which explains LC's attempt to clean up my input.

    Thank you.

    Phil
     
  11. AlabamaBoy Senior Member

    Alabama, USA
    American English
    I'd be tempted to say "the corset, as it were, is a separate matter."
     
  12. L'Enrico Senior Member

    Italiano
    I think I would say does not come into it were it not for the fact that I'm not sure I understand the original Italian.
    "Il busto non c'entra" would work if we took busto to mean torso, which it also does. If you're saying that here it is corset, then saying that "non c'entra" is odd. Muscular work is not normally done on corsets.
    I fail to see an opposition between the two sides of the sentence, which "non c'entra" normally implies.
    Incidentally, "si interesserà alle tensioni muscolari" is incorrect. "Il lavoro interesserà le tensioni muscolari" would be correct.

    E.
     
  13. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    I'm glad you said that, E.:) My immediate reaction was "who wrote this sentence?:eek:", but kept my comments to myself.;)

    Plus, had it not been for WWW's explanation, I would have had trouble understanding what was meant and would have taken busto to mean chest.;)
     
  14. WordsWordWords Senior Member

    Piemonte, Italy
    Am English
    Hi L'Enrico and london,

    You're right -- the Italian does leave you a bit perplexed and there are "issues" all over the place in this text :(:rolleyes: The author is not the best writer, and sometimes uses really archaic terms and forms in long-winded sentences.... Without going off topic, the original word he uses (in the previous paragraph to my OP) is "corazza" :eek: and how the patient came to begin wearing it (so therefore "busto" meaning "torso" is not possible).

    For purposes of being concise I abridged the original sentence:

    "La rassicuro che il busto lo terrà per tutto il tempo che ancora vorrà, anzi che noi non ce ne occuperemo affatto, perché il nostro lavoro si interesserà soltanto alle tensioni muscolari croniche; e il busto, per così dire, non c’entra."

    But not being a native I'm not sure how bad the sentence in its entirety sounds (my instincts say "pretty weird"!); it's the original, and I just need to convey it in nice English...

    Edit: It is possible that the use of "busto" for "corset" is a regional usage here in Piemonte, because I have in fact heard people of a certain age say "Il dottore mi had detto che devo portare un busto..." :confused:
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2013
  15. Pat (√2)

    Pat (√2) Senior Member

    Italia
    Italiano
    Io la leggo così :)
    Busto per corset è italiano standard.
     
  16. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Right, so my initial suggestion, doesn't come into it, was correct.;) Thanks Pat. And thanks to WWW too for posting the rest of the sentence.:)
     

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