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Non cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

Discussion in 'Medical Terminology' started by Valentina Marín, Aug 5, 2013.

  1. Valentina Marín Junior Member

    Español mexicano
    Hola, tengo una duda con respecto al término NON CUTANEOUS SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA, pues veo que para CUTANEOUS SQUAMOUS CELL CARCIOMA (sin el NON) puedo dejar CARCINOMA ESPINOCELULAR o CARCINOMA EPIDERMOIDE (sin agregar el CUTÁNEO) pues al ser espinocelular o epidermoide se entiende que es de la piel; sin embargo, no encuentro para nada dónde dejar el NON para el término en cuestión. Había pensado dejar CARCINOMA ESPINOCELULAR NO CUTÁNEO o EPIDERMOIDE NO CUTÁNEO, pero entonces ya estaría contradiciendo lo dicho antes.

    Espero puedan ayudarme por favor.

    Gracias.
     
  2. Ilialluna

    Ilialluna Senior Member

    Madrid
    Español-España
    Hola. Yo diría simplemente "carcinoma de células escamosas no cutáneo".
    Saludos.
     
  3. drpr New Member

    English
    Hola, tengo una duda con respecto al término NON CUTANEOUS SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA, pues veo que para CUTANEOUS SQUAMOUS CELL CARCIOMA (sin el NON) puedo dejar CARCINOMA ESPINOCELULAR o CARCINOMA EPIDERMOIDE (sin agregar el CUTÁNEO) pues al ser espinocelular o epidermoide se entiende que es de la piel; sin embargo, no encuentro para nada dónde dejar el NON para el término en cuestión. Había pensado dejar CARCINOMA ESPINOCELULAR NO CUTÁNEO o EPIDERMOIDE NO CUTÁNEO, pero entonces ya estaría contradiciendo lo dicho antes.

    NOOOOOO! False!!!!!

    Anything with a squamous epithelium can have a squamous cell carcinoma, not just the skin. I would say cáncer escamoso no cutáneo.

    Squamous cell carcinoma also (unfortunately b/c it's confusing) can be known as "epidermoid carcinoma" which the translation would be "cáncer epidermoide." If you wanted to use this, you could say "cáncer epidermoide no cutáneo."

    Basically the point is that you are NOT contraindicating or being redundant with the "no cutáneo" because squamous cell carcinoma can occur anywhere with squamous epithelium (skin, lungs, vagina, mouth)--the skin happens to be one place which is a squamous epithelium but there are many others, which is why the extra information of "no cutaneo" is needed.

    Also, you cannot translate "cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma" as just "carcinoma epidermoide" because you need the "cutáneo" to specify where it is.
     
  4. Bill Osler

    Bill Osler Senior Member

    North Carolina, USA
    English, USA
    I'm afraid that is not quite right. It looks to me like the biggest problem with "carcinoma epidermoide" is not a lack of reference to skin (doesn't the reference to epidermal tissue do that?) but rather the failure to specify that the cancer is squamous. I'm not a pathologist but I cannot recall any part of the body other than the skin that normally has epidermal tissue.

    I think the previously suggested "carcinoma de células escamosas no cutáneo" makes sense, though it is a bit out of my area of expertise so I don't know if it is the standard translation.
     
  5. bicontinental Senior Member

    U.S.A.
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    I agree with drpr’s statements above. I have a few additional language and terminology related comments:

    Squamous cell carcinoma obviously originates in/is derived from the squamous cell; it follows that every organ harboring this cell type may develop squamous cell carcinoma (skin, lung, mouth, cervix, esophagus etc. etc.)
    The squamous cell layer (as well as the associated carcinoma) is referred to in different ways…in modern day Anglo-Saxon medical terminology we typically use ‘squamous cell layer’, and ‘squamous (cell) carcinoma’ but slightly dated cancer terminology includes epidermoid carcinoma (not epidermal), and spinocellular carcinoma.
    Epidermoid = looking like/having the form of an epidermal cell/epidermis.
    Epidermal= pertaining to the epidermis (the most superficial cell layers of the skin)
    It follows that an epidermoid carcinoma is a malignant epithelial neoplasm whose cells have the morphology of epidermal cells (or look like epidermal cells), especially like those of the stratum spinosum (the spinous layer). These cells have also been referred to as spinous cells or prickle cells due to their histologic appearance, hence the designation of spinocellular carcinoma.


    In short, we can say that 'epidermoid carcinoma' refers to the histomorphologic type of a cancer which may arise in any squamous epithelium whether it be the epidermis or the squamous mucosal lining of inner organs.


    I think the main reason for the confusion is that you use epidermal and epidermoid interchangeably. A squamous cell carcinoma and an epidermoid carcinoma are one and the same beast. You’re right that skin is the only organ with 'epidermal tissue' or epi-dermis (lit. ‘upon the dermis’) but other organs have a squamous epithelial lining or a squamous mucosa. All of these organs and skin may develop SCC …extra-cutaneous and cutaneous respectively.

    Bic.
     
  6. Bill Osler

    Bill Osler Senior Member

    North Carolina, USA
    English, USA
    Actually, I do understand the difference between epidermoid and epidermal even though my last pathology class was nearly three decades ago; I did not intend to use epidermoid and epidermal interchangeably. My dictionary translated "epidermoide" as "tumor that contains epidermal cells." Unfortunately, I did not notice at the time that it also used the word "epidermoid" in another part of the definition. In other words, the dictionary I was using seems to have conflated the two words. Oh well.
    My apologies for adding to the confusion.
     
  7. bicontinental Senior Member

    U.S.A.
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    No apologies necessary! :) As a matter of fact, I think the main question was answered in the second post, so all of this is just 'tangential'.
    Best,
    Bic.
     

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