1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

Norwegian: 'har lyst på.....'

Discussion in 'Nordic Languages' started by StunningNorway, Apr 17, 2013.

  1. StunningNorway Junior Member

    Australia
    English - Australia
    Hei

    I am trying to understand a section of the textbook "På Vei."

    Han har lyst på kaffe.

    Can this phrase be translated into different tenses, depending on context?

    ie. He wants a coffee? (present)

    He would like a coffee? (future)

    He wanted a coffee? (past)

    I am confused about how this phrase is actually used by Norwegian speakers.

    Mange takk
     
  2. NorwegianNYC Senior Member

    New York, NY, USA
    Norwegian
    "har lyst på" literally means "is lusting for", but is the more common way to say "would like" in Norwegian. In this particular example, it means "He would like to have a [cup of] coffee"
     
  3. StunningNorway Junior Member

    Australia
    English - Australia
    Hei NYC

    Would I therefore be able to say/write, 'hadde lyst på......' to indicate past tense?

    eg Hun hadde lyst på kaffe. (She wanted/would have liked/she was wanting a coffee?) Or, would I have to leave out 'lyst på' for past tense, and use different vocabulary altogether?

    Another example from "På Vei".....

    Han har lyst til å lese avisen.

    Could I write/say, 'Han hadde lyst til å lese avisen'?


    Takk :)
     
  4. kirsitn

    kirsitn Senior Member

    Oslo, Norway
    Norway, Norwegian
    Yes, "hadde lyst på..." = "wanted to have..." and all your examples are ok. :)
     
  5. JohanIII

    JohanIII Senior Member

    Switzerland
    Swedish
    Is that really literal? Is there not a difference between "ha lyst på" and "lyste efter".
    What type of enjoyment you want (and even the strength of the desire) is implied.
    Please correct, guessing as a Swede here.
     
  6. StunningNorway Junior Member

    Australia
    English - Australia
    Tusen takk kirsitn......veldig hjelpsom for meg. :)
     
  7. NorwegianNYC Senior Member

    New York, NY, USA
    Norwegian
    Hi Johan,

    In Norwegian you can say "har lyst på" followed by an object/concept and "har lyst til" followed by a verb. Indeed, you can say "lyste etter" in Norwegian as well, but it is rare. This will not have the same meaning as previous two, but sooner "look/search for"
     
  8. bicontinental Senior Member

    U.S.A.
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    Personally, I would translate ‘ha lyst på…’ (the infinitive) into ‘feel like [having]…’ in colloquial AmE (don't know much about AustralianE, though), and ‘jeg vil gjerne ha en kop kaffe’ into ‘I would like a cup of coffee’ (the polite use of the conditional…not the future tense)
    Han har lyst på kaffe’ = ‘He feels like [having] a cup of coffee’ (the present tense). In the past tense: ‘Han hadde lyst på’, the future tense, ‘han vil ha lyst på’ i.e. only the verb changes through conjugation.
    Best,
    Bic.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2013
  9. NorwegianNYC Senior Member

    New York, NY, USA
    Norwegian
    bic - you are not wrong. "Ha lyst på" can perfectly well be translated "feel like having". However, compared to English, it is as close to "want" and "would like to have". For instance, "jeg har lyst på en kaffe" can either mean "I feel like a coffee", "I would like a coffee" or "I want a coffee" depending on context
     
  10. bicontinental Senior Member

    U.S.A.
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    Yes, context is always helpful!
    Bic.
     
  11. StunningNorway Junior Member

    Australia
    English - Australia
    Tusen takk for including the future tense form as well, Bic. (veldig hjelpsom)
     
  12. vthebee Junior Member

    English- Ireland
    Hi, is there any difference between jeg vil gjerne ha en kopp kaffe and jeg har lyst på en kopp kaffe?

    Takk for hjelpen.
     
  13. NorwegianNYC Senior Member

    New York, NY, USA
    Norwegian
    "Jeg vil gjerne ha en kopp kaffe" is normally used when you ask for a cup of coffee. "Jeg har lyst på en kopp kaffe" can be used in the way too, but more often expresses your desire for a cup of coffee, not the act of obtaining one
     
  14. vthebee Junior Member

    English- Ireland
    Hi Norwegian NYC, thanks for your answer it seems the uses of the 2 phrases are similar to English. Thanks.
     

Share This Page