Norwegian: International Women's Day

Discussion in 'Nordic Languages' started by Grefsen, Mar 8, 2007.

  1. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    According to my "norsk kalendar" today is "Den Internasjonale Kvinnedagen." I've been to Norway 10 times, but never during the month of March and am wondering if it is common to do anything special such as giving your wife, girlfriend, or even a very good female friend a gift such as flowers, chocolates, or a nice card?

    Since I'm halfway around the world from Norway, the only thing I can realistically do now is to send out a few eCards to my special Norwegian female friends. What sort of greeting would be appropriate to use in Norwegian? "God Internasjonale Kvinnedagen" seems a bit long to me, but maybe that is best. Would simply using "Gratulerer Med Dagen" be appropriate as well?

    "Tusen takk for hjelpen!"
     
  2. Pando

    Pando Junior Member

    Helsinki
    Finland: Swedish, Finnish, English
    The international women's day isn't really celebrated but it most likely appreciated if remembered. Especially a wife or girlfriend, but why not a female friend as well. It's also a day when you can pretty much wish a good day on a female stranger as well for small talk and not come off awkward.

    As far as I know gifts can be given, but aren't really that common (which on the other hand makes them more special). You might want to keep in mind is what the day stands for with equality and so on and not "over do" it. God internasjonale kvinnedagen or just god kvinnedagen sounds good to me. Just my two cents.
     
  3. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    "Tusen takk" Pando for your "rask svar." :cool: I think I'll go with "god kvinnedagen." :)
     
  4. Lemminkäinen

    Lemminkäinen Senior Member

    Oslo, Norway
    Norwegian (bokmål)
    I have to sort of disagree. It's nothing that's really (in my experience) "celebrated" on an individual basis; it's more common with marches in the streets, and speeches, &c.

    As for a greeting, well, that's a tough one. If anything, it would be god kvinnedag, in the indefinite form. But it sounds kind of awkward to be, and is really nothing you'd hear around hear. Gratulerer med dagen would probably fit better, but again, a bit unusual.
     
  5. Pando

    Pando Junior Member

    Helsinki
    Finland: Swedish, Finnish, English
    I know, but doesn't that make it more special? ;) Even if it isn't celebrated, wouldn't you agree it's appreciated when remembered? A bit of "everyday joy"?
    Thank you for correcting! But couldn't gratulerer med dagen be misunderstood as it doesn't specify why you are congratulating the other person. My way of thinking was that it would be better to go for the more "have a good day" type of greeting (god kvinnedag) instead of a congratulations (gratulerer med dagen)? If you still don't agree I give up. :)
     
  6. Lemminkäinen

    Lemminkäinen Senior Member

    Oslo, Norway
    Norwegian (bokmål)
    Well, quite frankly, I think it would depend on the person. Some might appreciate it, others would perhaps not. But yeah, I can see your point :)

    I doubt "gratulerer med dagen" would be misunderstood, but if there's any concern about that, then prefacing it with something like "Forresten, det er jo åttende mars i dag, så gratulerer med dagen" would make it quite clear.
    I understand what you mean, but "god kvinnedag" sounds a bit off to me. I don't think a lot of people would say it, but it sort of has a charm on its own :D
     
  7. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    I really hope "god kvinnedag" won't be misunderstood because I have already sent 12 SMSs to some good female friends in Norway a little over an hour ago. :eek:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 11, 2010
  8. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    This Saturday is "Den Internasjonale Kvinnedagen" and I'd like to send greetings to some of my female friends and family members in Norway. Since there haven't been any posts to this thread in almost seven years, I would appreciate it if some of the Norwegian speaking forum members could comment about greetings på norsk that would be appropriate to to send on this special day.

    På forhånd takk!
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2014
  9. NorwegianNYC Senior Member

    New York, NY, USA
    Norwegian
    "Til lykke med dagen!" Works for all non-religious and non-personal days
     
  10. raumar Senior Member

    Oslo, Norway
    Norwegian
    Yes, "til lykke med dagen" works in most contexts, but I am in doubt about this context. I agree with Lemminkäinen:

    The problem is that if you just write "Til lykke med dagen", the recipients might not understand what the congratulation is about. March 8th is an important day for the feminist movement, especially for the more radical, left-wing feminists. But many women -- especially the more conservative -- are not really concerned with the day. If you write "til lykke med dagen" , the reaction might be: "What? Does Grefsen think it is my birthday today?"

    How about "Til lykke med kvinnedagen"?
     
  11. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    Tusen takk for det, NNYC!
    Tusen takk for god forklaring og godt forslag! :thumbsup:
     
  12. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    Could you please explain why "Til lykke med dagen!" would be used for "all non-religious and non-personal days"? Is this primarily to make a distinction between using "Gratulerer med dagen" which is typically used on birthdays and certain holidays?
     
  13. raumar Senior Member

    Oslo, Norway
    Norwegian
    I think the meaning just was that "Til lykke med dagen" is a handy phrase which can be used on many occasions, including all non-religious and non-personal days.

    Both "Gratulerer med dagen" and "Til lykke med dagen" can be used for birthdays. Neither of them are much used for religious holidays -- we use God jul/påske/pinse instead. But my family in Trøndelag uses "Til lykke med jula" as a Christmas greeting.

    If you want to congratulate somebody who has achieved something (for example won an award or a competition), "gratulerer" is the natural choice. But not "Gratulerer med dagen"; either just "Gratulerer" or "Gratulerer med prisen/førsteplassen/etc".
     
  14. NorwegianNYC Senior Member

    New York, NY, USA
    Norwegian
    "Til lykke med dagen" is not connected with a specific event. It can be used as a birthday greeting, but "gratulerer med dagen" is more common. It is used for events such as 17th of May, wedding, and other celebratory events
     
  15. MindBoggle Senior Member

    Copenhagen
    Danish. English from childhood
    @Grefsen:

    I think maybe you think of the day in terms of 'mothers' day' etc. That is not really appropriate. Den Internasjonale Kvinnedagen is not like mothers' day. It's a 'kampdag' (i.e. a 'fighting day') like workers' day (May 1st). In other words: It is, basically, a day for women to fight against (what they conceive of as) male oppression.

    I wouldn't congratulate my woman on that day. Or give her anything. I'd stay away from her. :eek:
     
  16. NorwegianNYC Senior Member

    New York, NY, USA
    Norwegian
    MindBoggle - I disagree. I find it increasingly common to send out "Happy Women's Day" cards, postings and emails.
     
  17. MindBoggle Senior Member

    Copenhagen
    Danish. English from childhood
    I hope you are right. If the day became just another 'send your wife flowers'-day, that would be a good thing indeed.
     

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