Norwegian: sang, syngestykke, låta

Discussion in 'Nordic Languages' started by Xander2024, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. Xander2024 Senior Member

    Southern Russia
    Russian
    Hei,

    when I looked up the word "song" in my Russian-Norwegian dictionary, I saw the following three options: "chanson", "sang" and "syngestykke". And to top it all, I saw "låta" on the an Internet forum yesterday. Well, as for the "chanson", it's more or less clear: I guess this word refers to a chanson song. But what about the other three?

    Is it a regional or stylistic difference?

    Mange takk.
     
  2. NorwegianNYC Senior Member

    New York, NY, USA
    Norwegian
    Honestly - I have never seen "chanson" used as a Norwegian word, and "låta" is not Norwegian at all! If anything, 'song' = sang
     
  3. Xander2024 Senior Member

    Southern Russia
    Russian
    As for "låta", here is the whole sentence that was said on the forum: "Elsker denne låta. Himmelske danser er hentet fra en av mine favoritt album." ("Himmelske danser" is the name of a song). Is it not Norwegian?

    And what about "syngestykke"?

    Takk. :)
     
  4. basslop

    basslop Senior Member

    Norway
    Norwegian
    Aha - Ei låt - låta - låter - låtene eventually - en låt - låten - låter - låtene. This word originally corresponds to "a sound" in English, but is widely used for for a song too. My guess is that jazz/early rock musicians started to use "låt" this way. Still it's not a word you use for like classical music.
     
  5. Xander2024 Senior Member

    Southern Russia
    Russian
    Takk for hjelpen, basslop. Ja, du sier noe, det er tale om en sang av Morten Harket. :)
     
  6. basslop

    basslop Senior Member

    Norway
    Norwegian
    I would also like to mention the synonym "En lyd" is not for songs.
     
  7. Xander2024 Senior Member

    Southern Russia
    Russian
    What about "syngestykke", basslop?

    Takk.
     
  8. basslop

    basslop Senior Member

    Norway
    Norwegian
    I don't think I have heard "syngestykke". It should be understood by quite many though. Maybe it could be a new genuine Norwegian word.
     
  9. Xander2024 Senior Member

    Southern Russia
    Russian
    Hmm.. Where do dictionaries dig up those words that are unknown to native speakers, I wonder?

    Takk ihvertfall. :)
     
  10. Xander2024 Senior Member

    Southern Russia
    Russian
    Jeg har just funnet i min Stor Norsk Russisk Ordbok slike betydninger av "syngestykke": "an aria", "a love song", "a romance". Kan dette være sant?

    Takk.

    PS Your corrections are most welcome.
     
  11. NorwegianNYC Senior Member

    New York, NY, USA
    Norwegian
    Hi! I cannot find the word "syngestykke" in my books, but a quick google search reveals that it refers to Eng. singspiel (which is again is a German word)(I noticed you are Russian: Зингшпиль according to Wikipedia). It is a kind of opera, usually - especially a lighter version with spoken dialog and romantic or comic in nature. It is sometimes referred to as a 'ballad opera'. It also turns out that Norw. "syngestykke" and "syngespill" are synonyms.
     
  12. Xander2024 Senior Member

    Southern Russia
    Russian
    Hi Norwegian, takk for forskningen. :)
     
  13. utmarker Junior Member

    Stockholm
    Swedish
    Could "syngestykke" possibly be "svorsk"? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Svorsk

    "sångstycke" in Swedish is a word recognized by the Swedish Academy in its dictionary of Swedish words SAOL. http://sok.saol.se/pages/P943_M.jpg

    The Swedish word could mean simply a song, a tune or any kind of (short)vocal music.
    Literally in both Norwegian and Swedish it means "a piece of music".
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2012
  14. timtfj

    timtfj Senior Member

    Northwest England
    UK English
    If singspiel is an English word then it's a technical term in musicology---not a remotely common one. I'd only expect to encounter it if someone were writing about German music.

    As it happens I know someone who specialises in performing Grieg's music and who knows Norwegian, so I'll ask her about syngestykke and see if she can shed any light on it. (My thought is that someone who's performed one will know what it was).

    Edit: I've since asked a Danish musicologist, and got the reply
    which confirms what NorwegianNYC said.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2012
  15. bicontinental Senior Member

    U.S.A.
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
  16. aprendiendo argento

    aprendiendo argento Senior Member

    Premantura - Croatia
    Croatian (Chakavian)
  17. Ben Jamin Senior Member

    Norway
    Polish
    It must be a generation gap. If you listen to young people you will almost never hear the word 'sang'. It's 'låta' in 99%.
     
  18. NorwegianNYC Senior Member

    New York, NY, USA
    Norwegian
    "Låt" is a tune in English. It is a term used in jazz and popular music (you would not use it about classical music), but you often hear "sang" as well.
     
  19. lairthenair New Member

    Stavanger, Norway
    Norwegian
    I have never heard the french chanson used as a Norwegian word. As far as the word låt goes, it's an accepted synonym to sang. I don't think that syngestykke exists in the Norwegian vocabulary (I've never heard it being used and I can't find it in any popular dictonaries), but sangstykke does. Sangstykke litteraly means "a piece of a song", though it is used as a synonym to sang.
     
  20. NorwegianNYC Senior Member

    New York, NY, USA
    Norwegian
    Since this thread resurfaced, I make a quick inquiry to my friend, who is an opera singer. She confirmed that "syngestykke" and "syngespill" indeed are used in Norwegian. They are limited to the music/singing business, and the German term "singspiel" is also used among insiders. It is a light opera with spoken dialog, and is romantic or comic in nature. It is sometimes referred to as a 'ballad opera'.
     
  21. Xander2024 Senior Member

    Southern Russia
    Russian
    Tusen takk for hjelpen/ Thanks a lot everyone for making this thread a most informative one. :)
     

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