Norwegian: Shortlisted for an Academy Award

Discussion in 'Nordic Languages' started by Grefsen, Dec 21, 2012.

  1. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    In the following sentence how would I write "shortlisted" på norsk?


    The Norwegian film "Kon-Tiki" was shortlisted today for an Academy Award.


    Here's my attempt at translating the rest of the sentence:


    Den norske filmen «Kon-Tiki» "was shortlisted" i dag for en Oscar-pris.


    Here is one definition of "shortlisted":


    Included in a list of preferable items or candidates that have been selected for final consideration, as in making an award or filling a position.
     
  2. myšlenka Senior Member

    Norwegian
    Den norske filmen "Kon-Tiki" ble i dag nominert til Oscar.
     
  3. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    I might be wrong, but I don't think that it would be correct to use nominert in my example because there is a difference between being "shortlisted" and "nominated" for an Academy Award. The official nominations won't be announced until January 10.
     
  4. myšlenka Senior Member

    Norwegian
    Well, most of the Norwegian newspapers wrote nominert... A few wrote "short-listet" with quotation marks which means that they are aware of the difference but that a Norwegian expression doesn't exist :)
     
  5. StunningNorway Junior Member

    Australia
    English - Australia
    Hei

    Den norske filmen "Kon-Tiki" ble i dag nominert til Oscar.

    Would I be able to say/use var instead of ble in the sentence?

    bare lurer (?) (Just wondering)

    Takk :)
     
  6. henbjo Junior Member

    Valencia, Spain
    Norwegian
    As far as I know, there is no really good translation for being shortlisted in Norwegian, at least not in this context. Instillingsliste is sometimes used for a shortlist of applicants for a job, but I have never heard it being used outside that context. Å bli satt på instillingslista would be the translation of to be shortlisted.
     
  7. myšlenka Senior Member

    Norwegian
    Yes, but it wouldn't fit this context because the meaning changes slightly.
    var nominert - a state
    ble nominert - a change of state, a process

    "Bare lurer" is perfect :)
     
  8. basslop

    basslop Senior Member

    Norway
    Norwegian
    "Innstille" and "nominere" means basically the same but it is used in different contexts, as henbjo says. So if the film makers were supposed to apply for the Oscar then they would be "innstilt".
     
  9. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    Tusen takk for det myšlenka! :thumbsup:
    This is very interesting that some of the Norwegian newspapers used "short-listet" for the English compound word "shortlisted." I take it that a hyphen was used because the Norwegian word "listet" is being combined with the English word "short."
     
  10. henbjo Junior Member

    Valencia, Spain
    Norwegian
    That would be the most likely explanation, but it doesn't make for a good solution in my opinion. If they were going to translate half of the english word shortlisted (and still wrap it in quotations), they might as well do the whole thing (or no part at all).

    I do notice that kortliste is listed in the English-Norwegian dictionary by Kunnskapsforlaget (ordnett.no), but I have not once encountered it in use myself.
     
  11. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    I just looked up "innstille" in several Norwegian-English dictionaries and three of the many translations I found were "nominate, propose, & recommend."

    I agree. Here's the link to an article in Dagbladet that uses «short-listet» in a subheadline:

    http://www.dagbladet.no/2012/12/21/kultur/kon-tiki/film/oscar/nominert/24945682/

    It's interesting that Dagbladet used the English-norsk compound «short-listet» instead of kortliste OR "shortlisted." :confused:
     
  12. StunningNorway Junior Member

    Australia
    English - Australia

    Tusen takk, myslenka
     
  13. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    I just learned that a compound word that has one part derived from one language and another part derived from a different language is called a "hybrid word." The only example of an English-norsk hybrid word I've been able to find so far is 'hedgefond' and a hyphen isn't used in between the English word 'hedge' and the Norwegian word 'fond'. :confused:

    I also just learned that a compound word that is just a word for word translation borrowed from another language is called a "calque" so it looks like kortliste would be an example of a Norwegian calque of the English word shortlist.
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2012
  14. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2012
  15. NorwegianNYC Senior Member

    New York, NY, USA
    Norwegian
    Hi,
    Since English and Norwegian are closely related languages, this process is bound to happen. I personally find "short-listet" to be an odd construct, but I understand the rationale behind it. Obviously, the author was not familiar with the calque kortlistet, but since "listed" and the already existing "listet" are phonetically very similar, the construct "short"+listet is a reasonable substitute [although, kortlistet will probably prevail]. When it comes to the hybrid "hedgefond", it is a different story. "Hedge" can be calqued, but sufferes from not forming an intuitive meaning in Norwegian [both "hekk" and "(inn)hegning" are cognates, but hedge in hedgefund has an implied meaning that is not easy to transfer].

    An interesting phenomenon in Norwegian is that very few English words and expressions actually stick. They are frequently introduced, are usually calqued or replaced after a while.
     

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