Norwegian: The victim of a practical joke

Discussion in 'Nordic Languages' started by Grefsen, Apr 3, 2014.

  1. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    I'd like to know what some of the possible ways are for writing the following sentence på norsk:

    He was the victim of a practical joke on April Fools' day.

    Her er mitt forsøk:

    Han var offeret av en narrestrek på Aprilsnarr dag.
     
  2. sjiraff

    sjiraff Senior Member

    Scotland, UK
    English
    I believe you say "for" after things like offer, "Et offer for vold" and other things like "De som er utsatt for noe" (vulnerable to/for something), it can be kind of tricky for a native English speaker with the whole "av" thing in Norwegian with things like this.

    Besides that I'm not sure (although I might be wrong) if you would say offeret in this case, I think that might be a thing we just say in English. Maybe here you would just say "Han ble offer for..."?.
     
  3. Ífaradà Junior Member

    Norwegian/Yoruba
    You are correct. "Han ble offer for" is the right expression.

    I would translate it this way: han ble offer for en aprilspøk.
     
  4. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    Tusen takk for det sjiraff! :thumbsup:

    I was wondering if I should write "et offer" instead of "offeret" and "for" instead of "av." Another option I was also considering was to use "er utsatt."

    Tusen takk igjen! :thumbsup:

    I'll anxiously wait to see what comments some of the native Norwegian speaking members have. :)

    I didn't have to wait very long. Tusen takk for det Ífaradà! :thumbsup:

    So it looks like "en aprilspøk" is a much more efficient way to express "en narrestrek på Aprilsnarr dag" på norsk.

    Tusen takk igjen! :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2014
  5. Ífaradà Junior Member

    Norwegian/Yoruba
    Indeed!

    You're very welcome:)
     
  6. raumar Senior Member

    Oslo, Norway
    Norwegian
    It certainly is -- and there aren't many good alternatives, either. "Narrestrek" sounds a bit dated. There aren't any good Norwegian words for "practical joke", as far as I know. The English phrase "practical joke" is sometimes used in Norwegian, for lack of a better word.

    The Norwegian translation of "April Fools' day" is just "første april". The day isn't called anything that refers to "fool", but everybody knows that "første april" is that day you get fooled.
     
  7. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    Would it be possible to use "skøyerstrek, fantestrek eller rampestrek" for "practical joke"?
    Is it more common to use "første april" instead of "Aprilsnarr" på norsk?
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2014
  8. raumar Senior Member

    Oslo, Norway
    Norwegian
    Well, it is certainly possible to use skøyerstrek, fantestrek, rampestrek or narrestrek. But in my opinion, all these four words are more often used to describe pranks done by naughty children, if they are used at all. All of them are also a bit old-fashioned or dated, more likely to be used by my grandparents' generation.

    "Aprilsnarr" can either be the joke (the "aprilspøk") or the person who is fooled, while "Første april" is the day.
     
  9. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    Tusen takk raumar!
    All four of these compound words contain "strek." Could "strek" mean "unexpected" in the first example?

    skøyer + strek => jokester + unexpected (something unexpected done by a practical joker).
     
  10. raumar Senior Member

    Oslo, Norway
    Norwegian
    No, I don't think so. "Strek" means "prank" or "mischief" in this context, and the first part of these compound words characterizes the person who is responsible, or the way it is done.

    Another example is "guttestrek" -- a prank done by boys, a boyish prank.
     

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