Notspot

Discussion in 'Dictionary Additions' started by Alxmrphi, Jul 26, 2011.

  1. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    Term: (A word or expression you have seen in writing)
    Notspot


    Your definition or explanation:
    A play on words from "hotspot", like a "WiFi hotspot" but the opposite, to show something doesn't exist in that particular spot (i.e. no coverage for a mobile phone etc).


    Example: (An example of the term in use)
    Three million UK homes are web Notspots (taken from here)

    One or more places you have seen the term: (Please give URLs/links to web pages, or a full description of a print publication.)
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-14291335
    http://www.reuters.com/article/2009/05/27/us-britain-internet-idUSTRE54Q1CK20090527
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/02/02/cbn_notspot/
    http://www.bluenowhere.net/?page_id=468
    http://forums.thinkbroadband.com/notspot/3861206-four-rural-notspots-to-go-online.html
    http://www.gn.apc.org/network/news/uk-broadband-notspots-revealed
    http://www.electricpig.co.uk/2010/1...ts-create-for-playstation-move-and-hannspree/
    http://blog.simplifydigital.co.uk/2011/02/time-to-convert-notspots-into-hotspots/
    http://oro.open.ac.uk/24595/
    http://www.djisystems.co.uk/content/bt-offers-fill-broadband-notspots-if-government-pays
    http://www.publicservice.co.uk/news_story.asp?id=14591

    Etc etc....






    Have you looked for this term or meaning in dictionaries, and not found it? Yes
     
  2. swift

    swift Senior Member

    Spanish – Costa Rica (Valle Central)
    Hi Alex,

    I can see that this term is widely used in the UK but I can't find any instances of this term used on any website from the USA—but then I wasn't very exhaustive...

    Here's another example:

    “There are still people in the UK suffering this very problem, and that's the reason we've launched a broadband notspot site for those who can't get broadband, or those who can only attain very low speeds.”

    Source : http://www.thinkbroadband.com/news/3966-living-in-a-broadband-notspot.html

    For more examples of this term: http://www.wordnik.com/words/notspot

    And I just discovered here: http://www.broadband-notspot.org.uk/ that there is another term related with broadband failures: slow-spot. Should we add this one too?
     
  3. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    I think the combination is clear with slow spot, so for the same reason we wouldn't have "red bird" or something in the dictionary, because it's not a unique meaning that can't be understood by easily breaking down the components, for that reason maybe not. With 'notspot' I think it could be a little less clear for a learner, so has more of a need to be put into a dictionary.

    But I'm no lexicographer....
     
  4. swift

    swift Senior Member

    Spanish – Costa Rica (Valle Central)
    I agree with you, Alex. The sense of slow-spot seems to be more obvious, so it doesn't really need a new entry.

    Anyway, I like notspot. :) (The word, of course; I actually live in a notspot and that's something you can't like :D)
     

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