nouns derived from verbs

Discussion in 'English Only' started by virr2, Aug 28, 2006.

  1. virr2

    virr2 Senior Member

    Warsaw
    Poland
    Hi,
    I am looking for compound nouns that end in -ar, e.g. liar or beggar.
    Could you help me?

    Thank you
    Virr
     
  2. foxfirebrand

    foxfirebrand Senior Member

    The Northern Rockies
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Your examples aren't compound nouns. Do you mean nouns that you would expect to end in -er or -or, like worker or actor?

    Then there are words like braggart and voyeur.

    My memory is only coming up with variants and exotic words, like pedlar or knight templar. And exemplar. Ah, that academic one finally surfaced-- registrar.

    Or is it really compound nouns you're after? Like bugbear and sidecar?
    .
     
  3. virr2

    virr2 Senior Member

    Warsaw
    Poland
    Yes, you're right. What I meant was a kind of derivative nouns, derived from verbs, e.g liar from to lie, beggar from to beg.

    Pedlar
    is great, thank you :)

    Moderator note: thread title was changed based on this post.
     
  4. virr2

    virr2 Senior Member

    Warsaw
    Poland
    Maxiogee, thank you for your list. I've already copied it. It will come in handy
    :D:D.

    Virr
     
  5. maxiogee Senior Member

    imithe
    Just a few, after condiserable pondering…

    familiar (yes, it is also a noun!)
    justiciar
    pulsar
    scalar
    seminar

    and I'm not sure about scholar :confused:
     
  6. virr2

    virr2 Senior Member

    Warsaw
    Poland
    Familiar - Oh, I didn't know that. Could you give an example how it functions in a sentence?
     
  7. maxiogee Senior Member

    imithe
    While I would suggest that a witch's familiar is actually an adjective which has been separated from its noun - familiar spirit, the noun familiar is used of someone attached to the house of a bishop. The person lives in the bishop's house as a family member, providing some service in return for their keep. There may be some connection between that familiar and the one who was an officer of the Inquisition, who arrested suspected persons. Both words derive from family.
     
  8. virr2

    virr2 Senior Member

    Warsaw
    Poland
    It is great to know that, thanks :)

    Virr
     
  9. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    ... burglar
     
  10. virr2

    virr2 Senior Member

    Warsaw
    Poland
    Thanks :)
    to burgle-a burglar
     
  11. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    :eek: Oops, when I checked I found that burgle is a back-formation from burglar so it doesn't really count:eek:
     
  12. river Senior Member

    U.S. English
    These are called "agent nouns."
     

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