Number: Reading, speaking, numbers - How to say this number ,513,980

Discussion in 'English Only' started by roniy, Mar 28, 2007.

  1. roniy Senior Member

    Brooklyn NY
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    How to say this number ,513,980, in words ?

    Is it correct to say 'five hundred and thirteen thousand and nine hundred and eighty'.
    OR

    'five thirteen thousand and nine eighty '???
     
  2. ps.sur.mer Junior Member

    United States, English
    five hundred thirteen thousand, nine hundred eighty
     
  3. AngelEyes

    AngelEyes Senior Member

    English - United States
    I'd say:

    Five hundred (and) thirteen thousand, nine hundred and eighty.

    I think the first and is optional, and I wouldn't use it. Well, the second one is, too, but I'd use that one. Just a personal preference.


    AngelEyes
     
  4. roniy Senior Member

    Brooklyn NY
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    Thank you for your help but I have one more question
    Don't you need an 'and' after 'thousand' ?
    because this is one number 513980
     
  5. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    BE - as AngelEyes wrote with both ands.

    No and after thousand.

    It seems that in BE we use and for numbers less than 1,000
    INCLUDING when we are talking about the thousands, millions, etc, etc, ...
    So even quite large numbers break into three digit sets - which are numbers of hundreds.

    www,xxx,yyy,zzz

    www billion, xxx million, yyy thousand, zzz

    We read each of the three digit combinations www, xxx, yyy and zzz the same way. So you only need to learn how we say three digit numbers and how we put them together for bigger numbers (as above).
     
  6. Diddy Senior Member

    C.A. Spanish
    Hi forum!!!
    Sorry to ask about this subject again, but I am still lost in the writing-numbers-in-words subject. While I read more about this, I got more confused with all the different opinions I have found!!!

    I was reading through several previous threads about this same matter, and I finally decided to take this old thread, and try to follow panjadrum's suggestion above, and I would appreciate if you correct me the following number, accordingly. I am just adding one more three-digit set to the same number in order to have the million section.

    255,513,980:

    two hundred and fifty-five million, five hundred and thirteen thousand, nine hundred and eighty.

    My bigger concern is about the use of the "and" in the million and thousand sections, and if I should write the commas (,) between each three digits sets.

    Thanks again,
     
  7. Dimcl Senior Member

    British Columbia, Canada
    Canadian English
    This is absolutely correct, Diddy ("ands" and commas included).
     
  8. envie de voyager Senior Member

    Niagara Falls, Canada
    english-canadian
    In a scientific setting, the word and does not appear in any numbers.
     
  9. Diddy Senior Member

    C.A. Spanish
    Thanks so much!!!! It seems that I finally have resolved the puzzle of English numbers.:D
     
  10. the_del_star Senior Member

    Southern California
    USA, English
    I think, like ps and envy, that there shouldn't be any "ands" in formal/ technical writing.

    Chatspeak is a whole other animal.
     
  11. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    It is perhaps unusual to write numbers out like this in a scientific context, but that is not the point. If a BE-speaker were to be writing out numbers in full in any context, and would be included as I indicated above.
    The same point applies. You're not, surely, suggesting that BE is chatspeak :eek:

    Your points are, I believe, valid for AE - omitting and in numbers is considered a clear indication of an AE-speaker over here.

    (Look up speaking numbers in the WR dictionary.)
     
  12. the_del_star Senior Member

    Southern California
    USA, English
    Oh! I didn't mean to do that, just note that it's ok in AE chatspeak.
    Sorry!
     
  13. susanna76 Senior Member

    Romanian
    So AE omits the ands. What about the final and in a shorter number (A) and longer number (B)? I'd say:

    A. 135
    one hundred and thirty-five
    A'. 135 guests
    a hundred and thirty-five guests
    B. 468,135
    four hundred sixty-eight thousand, one hundred and thirty-five
    B'. 468,135 euros
    four hundred sixty-eight thousand, one hundred thirty-five euros

    Can you please correct my readings from an AE and a BE standpoint? Thanks!
     
  14. Myridon

    Myridon Senior Member

    Texas
    English - US
    In American schools, the most commonly taught rule is that "and" is reserved for the decimal point when the decimal part is read as a fraction.
    135.11 is one-hundred, thirty-five and eleven one-hundredths or one-hundred, thirty-five point one one.
    However, there are many do not follow this rule outside of school and use "and" as you have it.
    I'm not sure anyone would say B' but rather
    B''. four-hundred and sixty-eight thousand, one-hundred and thirty-five
    Both three digit parts would have an "and".
    As I often follow the "school rules", I would most often say:
    C. four-hundred sixty-eight thousand, one-hundred thirty-five
    with no "and" at all.
     
  15. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    In the BrE maths world, the decimal point is never preceded by "and" nor followed by fractions or numbers other than single digits so "one hundred and thirty five point one one" would be the only choice. 210.48 could only be "two hundred and ten point four eight" and could not end in "point forty eight".
     
  16. susanna76 Senior Member

    Romanian
    Thanks, Myridon. Edit: So to simplify things
    1. For numbers only, go for no "and" at all, or for all of them.
    2. For numbers followed by a noun, include the "and."

    JulianStuart: Thanks so much. I was not aware you couldn't say "point forty-eight." Thanks for . . . pointing that out:).
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2011
  17. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    That is true for BrE, but it is widely said that way in the US.
     
  18. Egmont Senior Member

    Massachusetts, U.S.
    English - U.S.
    Two other things:

    1. There is never a comma before the first digit of a number or after the last one. This should be written in figures as "513,980" with only one comma in the middle.

    2. In English there is no space between a punctuation mark (such as the question mark here) and the word before it.
     
  19. halmom Senior Member

    korean
    I am trying to read the following numbers as follows. Am I right?

    74, 621, 990

    seventy four million six hundred twenty one thousand nine hundred ninety nine
     
  20. SwissPete

    SwissPete Senior Member

    94044 USA
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    seventy four million six hundred twenty one thousand nine hundred ninety nine :tick:

    Keep in mind that different languages have different punctuation schemes for numbers.
     
  21. That's the AE reading.

    In BE we say 'Seventy-four million, six hundred and twenty-one thousand, nine hundred and ninety'.
     
  22. Biffo Senior Member

    England
    English - England
  23. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Moderator note: halmom's thread (from post 19) has been merged with an earlier thread.
     

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