obitum hominum

Discussion in 'Lingua Latina (Latin)' started by figofredo, Dec 18, 2012.

  1. figofredo New Member

    Portuguese
    Carissimi,

    how would you translate the expression "obitum hominum", as it goes inserted in the title of this book, written by the Swiss theologian Ludwig Lavater: De spectris, lemuribus et magnis atque insolitis fragoribus et prasagitionibus quae obitum hominum, clades mutationesque imperiorum praecedunt"? I have already translated most part of this title, but it might as well be full of mistakes.

    Thank you.
     
  2. Quiviscumque

    Quiviscumque Moderator

    Ciudad del paraíso
    Spanish-Spain
  3. figofredo New Member

    Portuguese
    Thank you, but I'm looking for the meaning of that expression "as it goes inserted" in the phrase, i.e., acting as subordinative, if I say it correctly. What you just gave me any dictionary can do, but I'm sorry if this request of mine shows how unlearned I am rather than posing a true challenge to you.

    Atenciosamente,

    G.
     
  4. Scholiast

    Scholiast Senior Member

    Reading, UK
    English - UK
    Greetings

    "...which presage persons' deaths"
     
  5. J.F. de TROYES Senior Member

    francais-France
    Could you please give your try ? Anyhow the meaning of obitum hominum cannot change inserted in any clause . Here this phrase is one of the three direct objects (1 obitum hominum, 2 clades, 3 mutationesque imperiorum ) of the verb praecedunt ; the suject is the relative pronoun quae the antecedents of which are insolitis fragoribus et prasagitionibus . Hope it helps.
     
  6. Quiviscumque

    Quiviscumque Moderator

    Ciudad del paraíso
    Spanish-Spain
    Sorry, I was thinking you were confused by the similar endings ("-um") of two consecutive words.

    No subordinative, it is a plain, typical title with a plain, typical Latin word order:

    "On [...certain things] that presage persons' death [...and other things]"
     
  7. figofredo New Member

    Portuguese
    Quiviscumque, Scholiast and J.F. de Troyes, les agradezco. I believe I had it all right, after your answers. And, in reply to de Troyes, I fear my being too ridiculous, by showing to you what resulted from my attempt of translating this phrase, since I'd not adventure myself by doing so in English. I have nonetheless translated it to Portuguese, which follows.

    "Dos espectros, lêmures e maiores, todavia insólitos, boatos e presságios que precedem a morte dos homens, a destruição e o império da mutação"
     
  8. Fred_C

    Fred_C Senior Member

    France
    Français
     

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