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Ogni dolce Aura che spira

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by buttermarblepopcorn, Dec 31, 2006.

  1. buttermarblepopcorn Junior Member

    Los Angeles, California
    USA - English, Mandarin
    Ciao amici!

    Vi prego di aiutarmi.

    Ho ricevuto una richiesta da un' amica di aiutarla a tradurre un breve testo di una canzone barrocca (o forse piu' antica, come rinascimentale). Non mi ha scritto né il suo autore né il titolo... nulla fuori dal puro testo. Sono soltanto uno studente, un amante della lingua italiana. Come tanti testi dal periodo barrocco, la grammatica e la sintassi di questo testo è come il latino per me (cioè, non posso capire un c----! e mi sento stupida e completamente inutile come un "amante" d'italiano; che so io? niente!)...

    Anyway, ecco il testo:

    Ogni dolce Aura che spira
    par che dica ecco il mio ben.
    L'alma in sen d'amor sospira qua l'attendo
    e mai non vien.
    Non responde a chi delira
    non sicura piu di me.

    Vi ringrazio tantissimo!!
    Amy
     
  2. _forumuser_

    _forumuser_ Senior Member

    New York City
    Italian
     
  3. buttermarblepopcorn Junior Member

    Los Angeles, California
    USA - English, Mandarin
    (Now reverting to English because I am short on time tonight):

    Thank you so much, Forumuser!

    I have some additional questions for you or anyone else who might know --

    Could "il mio ben" refer to "my beloved"?

    Could "but *it* never comes" be "but *he* never comes"?

    Also could it be "He no longer cares for me"?

    Or is it clear that the subject is an "it"? Can anyone figure out what this person is singing about?

    Thank you again, so much,
    Amy
     
  4. _forumuser_

    _forumuser_ Senior Member

    New York City
    Italian
    What "mio ben" refers to is hard to tell based on these lines alone. Bene generally means well-being/happiness/what is good for me, a state of things rather than a loved one, who would be rather called mio bello/a, mio amato/a etc. But again, I can't be certain.

    As for the gender of the speaking voice it is, perhaps deliberately, left ambiguous. THe strong, assertive tone would seem to suggest a man longing for his beloved, but then you have the word sen = seno (breasts) which evokes a woman to me, although I do not exclude that it could be used for men as well in older Italian.

    Have you tried googling it for more information on where/when/by whom it was written?
     
  5. buttermarblepopcorn Junior Member

    Los Angeles, California
    USA - English, Mandarin
    Hi again,

    To answer your last question: yes, I googled it. I googled the heck out of it. Every phrase, every word. Most of the semi-hits I got were for texts written by Metastasio -- whose works were often utilized in baroque libretti -- and, unfortunately, whose translations are not widely accessible online.

    For "il mio ben," I did get a few hits that *seemed* to translate it as "my beloved," which is why I asked.

    I think the text is sung by a soprano. I find it almost maddening that the words are so vague!

    Open to more suggestions from anyone, including Metastasio scholars (heh),
    Amy
     

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