on deck

Discussion in 'English Only' started by quietdandelion, Sep 26, 2007.

  1. quietdandelion

    quietdandelion Banned

    Homesweethome
    Formosa/Chinese
    In a baseball game, is it the next hitter or the substitute pitcher on deck? Could it apply to both the hitter and the pitcher? Thanks.
     
  2. tepatria Senior Member

    Onondaga, Ontario
    Canadian English
    I don't know much about baseball, but usually on deck applies to whatever is next, so it could apply to both. Anyway, this will move your post up again and someone else can answer.
     
  3. bibliolept

    bibliolept Senior Member

    Northern California
    AE, Español
    I believe I've heard it both ways; possibly it's more common to refer to the pitcher on deck.
     
  4. AngelEyes Senior Member

    English - United States
    I'd say no to your question, QD.

    SOURCE

    It's the next hitter on deck, and the pitchers are warming up in the bullpen.

    But I'm no Babe Ruth. ;)

    AngelEyes
     
  5. daviesri Senior Member

    Houston, TX
    USA English
    The deck is where the batters take their practice swings before they go up to bat. You will have a batter at home plate (batters box) batting and the next batter is "on deck". If the pitcher is "on deck", he is waiting for his turn to bat.
     
  6. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    It's the next batter. See dictionary.com

    I suspect the term comes from naval usage, e.g. "all hands on deck" where sailors come up to the deck of the ship from inside.

    In baseball, players awaiting their turns at bat sit in a "dugout," a below-ground-level bench shielded from the sun. Thus, when the next batter climbs up out of the dugout he goes to a chalk circle called the "on-deck circle," where the batter might take a few practice swings, kneel or whatever he chooses while awaiting his turn at bat. This is a time-saving device.

    The metaphor has expanded to generally mean "whoever is next."
     
  7. quietdandelion

    quietdandelion Banned

    Homesweethome
    Formosa/Chinese
    Thanks, my kind and helpful friends.
    Now I'm sure that the next batter can be on deck, but can it apply to "the substitute pitcher?
     
  8. AngelEyes Senior Member

    English - United States
    QD,

    The terms I'm familiar with are Relief Pitcher and Pitch-hitter.

    source

    The only player that would be on deck is the pitch hitter, which if you go to my link, does refer to the man as a substitute hitter.

    AngelEyes
     
  9. bibliolept

    bibliolept Senior Member

    Northern California
    AE, Español
    Any player can be "on the deck," but the phrase means that the player is about to go to bat. This is why "pitcher is on the deck" is a common phrase: he's generally a mediocre batter, something that must be taken into consideration.

    As was mentioned before, the pitchers "warm up" in the bullpen, throwing balls at a "bullpen catcher."
     
  10. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    I think you mean pinch hitter :)
     
  11. quietdandelion

    quietdandelion Banned

    Homesweethome
    Formosa/Chinese
    Thanks again, my dear friends.I get it completely now.
     
  12. AngelEyes Senior Member

    English - United States

    sdgraham,

    Um, yes...that would be pinch hitter, wouldn't it?

    :D :D :D

    Did you laugh? I did. I believe I said I was no Babe Ruth. ;)
    Do some posters get sent to the showers around here?

    Anyway, thank you for the correction.

    Angelthe babeEyes
     

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