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"on the nearest friday"

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Piterolex, May 27, 2013.

  1. Piterolex New Member

    Poland
    Poland - Polish
    Since this is my first post - I'd like to welcome everyone ;>
    So - hello! ;)

    And returning to the question; is this sentence correct:
    I am available for an interview on the nearest friday.
    ?

    I've had a test (I'm from Poland, thus English is my second language) and my teacher told me, that it should be written as:
    I am available for an interview the nearest friday.
    But didn't say why :/

    So the questions are:
    1) is the first sentence (that with "... for an interview on the nearest friday") correct?
    2) ... and if it isn't, but the second one is ("... for an interview the nearest friday") - then, why?

    Thank you for every answer ;>
     
  2. SwissPete

    SwissPete Senior Member

    94044 USA
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    :) Welcome to the forum, Piterolex.

    As far as I am concerned, the standard way to convey your idea is to say: "I am available for an interview next Friday".

    Please note that days of the week (and months) are capitalized in English.
     
  3. Linkway Senior Member

    British English
    I am doubtful about what "nearest Friday" means unless you say nearest to what. It does not sound natural to me.
    "On" can sometimes be omitted with dates but it is safest to include it. Some may see it as implied, and unnecessary in informal contexts, but it is not wrong to include a suitable preposition.
    E.g.
    I'll see you (on) Friday.
    You need to hand it in by ten o'clock (on) Monday.
    As well as in informal settings, 'on' with dates is sometimes omitted by technical report writers seeking to use a terse style.

    Edit: posts crossed.
     
  4. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    Certainly not "nearest Friday" As I write this, the Friday of last week is the same distance away as the Friday of this week. I can't make it on the Friday just past :)

    I like "next Friday" as well, but, unfortunately, not all English speakers have the same concept of what it means. Therefore I take care to specify the date.

    See these previous threads:

    This Thursday Next Thursday
    Last / this
    this past Monday/ this Monday/ last Monday
     
  5. skymouse Junior Member

    central London
    English - London
    You can say "I'm available for an interview on the nearest Friday to Easter" (or similar). That would mean the Friday the fewest number of days before or after Easter.

    But "I'm available for an interview on the nearest Friday" would just lead one to ask "the nearest Friday to what?" As SwissPete suggests, maybe the intended sentence is "I'm available for an interview next Friday". However, beware ............ "next Friday" (at least in British English) is ambiguous, because sometimes it means the Friday after next! So I would always play safe, and say "I'm available for an interview this Friday" (which means the very next Friday after today (but if today is Friday, you may still confuse some people)) or best of all "I'm available for an interview on Friday, 31 May 2013".

    I've never encountered "I'm available for an interview the nearest Friday", and as a native British English speaker I wouldn't be able to guess its meaning.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2013
  6. e2efour Senior Member

    England (aged 73)
    UK English
    Hi Piterolex and welcome to the forum!

    The nearest Friday means nothing as a time phrase, unless we say what it is nearest to, e.g. on the Friday nearest to the end of the month.
    Note that we do not use near to refer the future, except in the phrase "in the near future".
    So I assume that you meant to write I am available for (an) interview next Friday/this coming Friday.

    (A small tip: we never write a comma before a clause starting with that, i.e. My teacher told me that it should be written like this.)
     
  7. Piterolex New Member

    Poland
    Poland - Polish
    Ok, thanks; "I am available for an interview next Friday" is what I meant :)

    Habit from Polish language; thanks - I'll remember this :>
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2013

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