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onomatopoeia

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Vanda, Jan 15, 2006.

  1. Vanda

    Vanda Moderesa de Beagá

    Belo Horizonte, BRASIL
    Português/ Brasil
    Hello nice people,

    Would you please tell me which would be the onomatopoeia for a whistle in this context: a gorgeous woman passes by and a guy just whistles at her? In Portuguese it's : fiu fiu!

    Thank you very much!
     
  2. KittyCatty

    KittyCatty Senior Member

    Cambridge
    English UK
    I know the sound you're talking about, but we never normally write it, you would be more likely to just say the guy 'wolf-whistled' at her. everyone would know what you meant by that
    xxxxxx
     
  3. Aupick

    Aupick Senior Member

    Strasbourg, France
    UK, English
    As KittyCatty says, I don't think one exists yet, but if I had to create one, I'd say 'fwit fwoo'.
     
  4. *Cowgirl*

    *Cowgirl* Senior Member

    USA English
    I love it!

    I agree. I don't think there is an otomata. word for whistle.
     
  5. foxfirebrand

    foxfirebrand Senior Member

    The Northern Rockies
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Fweeet! By analogy from tweet, which is a bird sound that's weak on attack and thus more like a whistle than a peep or a chirp.
    .
     
  6. Brioche

    Brioche Senior Member

    Adelaide
    Australia English
    Don't owls say "twit-twoo"?
     
  7. the-pessimist Senior Member

    England
    English, United Kingdom
    i think we should send a delegate to the next dictionary revision board, and recommend fiu fiu or fwit fwoo, or my value-added version: phuit/phwit phwoo (just to be different :) ) to be added into the english language.


    and yes, to my portugues buddy, we just use 'to wolf-whistle'
     
  8. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Indeed, but we are talking about wolves here, not owls.
     
  9. foxfirebrand

    foxfirebrand Senior Member

    The Northern Rockies
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    That could be a corruption, since Shakespeare says they sing "to-whit to-who." And of the inflection, he says it's "a merry note."
    .
     
  10. Vanda

    Vanda Moderesa de Beagá

    Belo Horizonte, BRASIL
    Português/ Brasil
    fwit fwoo , phuit/phwit phwoo

    aupick, I've found it difficult whistling fwit fwoo. hehehe
    ibby, the same with your version. :D

    Thank you all for your contributions.
     
  11. the-pessimist Senior Member

    England
    English, United Kingdom
    well if we're going to get technical!!.... (rolls his sleeves up)..

    fiu fiu doesn't make great whistling either! this is due to the change in tone/pitch required when performing the ancient art of wolf whistling...

    fiu fiu only sounds like the first of the two-part traditional call to mate, repeated (twice in total). it requires a climax so to speak, and therefore, our suggestions of fwit fwoo (and extrapolations of the sort) provide a more accurate description :p

    esperando a sua resposta,

    ibby :cool:
     
  12. Vanda

    Vanda Moderesa de Beagá

    Belo Horizonte, BRASIL
    Português/ Brasil
    aha, that's because you can't hear me whistling. :D

    What I've impled is that I'm not able to make that sound in English. My mouth, teeth and tongue don't cooperate. Maybe 'cause I'm a woman and it requires a perfect exemplar of a male hunter to accomplish it.:rolleyes:

    I was just teasing you! lol
     
  13. the-pessimist Senior Member

    England
    English, United Kingdom
    oh.. i did not realise you were female. lol

    i'll send you a .wav audio file some day; of my version ;)

    but i'm sure you just need to walk out your door to hear a perfect example :)
     
  14. river Senior Member

    U.S. English
    Whistle, like scissor, is onomatopoeic.
     

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