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Pa i cho

Discussion in 'Polski (Polish)' started by BezierCurve, Jan 5, 2013.

  1. BezierCurve Senior Member

    Czy jest na forum taka osoba, która nie spotkała się nigdy z "niedbałymi" formami trybu rozkazującego "patrz" i "chodź"?
     
  2. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Do you think these are sloppy forms? Many people speak like that. I think they look more like regular, imperative forms -- maybe not very formal, but quite standard.
     
  3. BezierCurve Senior Member

    I think they can be considered "sloppy", although I tend to use them myself.

    EDIT: Just to make it clear, what I consider "sloppy" is the "pa" and "cho" (as in the title), not the regular forms.
     
  4. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Oh, I am sorry then. I have never heard pa and ho. I was just wondering if there was not enough space in the thread title to spell the words out. :D
     
  5. R.O

    R.O Senior Member

    Polish
    Ja się z nimi oczywiście spotkałem. Używałem ich jako nastolatek. Teraz to mi się raczej nie zdarza.
     
  6. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Didn't Pa mean Bye bye, once? See you? This is really something new to me.
     
  7. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Well, I have a tendency to use those very frequently, but it has a rural ring to it, so to speak.

    My favourite expression using 'cho' is 'Cho no tu!' - 'Come here!'
     
  8. BezierCurve Senior Member

    Yeah, this reminds of the old joke about a girl teasing a sailor who asked her what place was that ("Cho-no-lulu, marynarzu").
     
  9. R.O

    R.O Senior Member

    Polish
    Just for the record, I find these forms more informal than rural, but it's interesting it might be perceived this way.
    Liliana, pa still means bye. :)
     
  10. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Thank God. It was a nice word.(and fortunately seems to be still alive)
     
  11. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Well, when I do use it, I use it for effect, but there are those people, not necessarily from rural areas -- to reconsider my previous point, who speak in a very sloppy way, and 'pa' i 'cho' are yet another examples of it.
     
  12. R.O

    R.O Senior Member

    Polish
    I do use language sloppily at times too. An example of it would be elision of the /k/ sound in the word'czekaj!'. However, I somehow feel that cleaving the word in two would be too much. ;)
     
  13. marco_2 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    When I was a boy, I frequently heard cho no tu! in my yard (I live in Wrocław), though I never spoke like that. And once when went to Kielce, I noticed that they'd used an expression chodzi no tu!
     
  14. R.O

    R.O Senior Member

    Polish
    Are you sure it wasn't 'chodź no tu?'
     
  15. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Adding to R.O's question, how many people did you hear say it? I just asked around, since I have a couple of friends in Kielce, and not a single one of them heard of this.
     
  16. Ben Jamin Senior Member

    Norway
    Polish
    In my childhood in Toruń I heard "cho no tu" as very rude expression, usually from the worse bullies in the backyard. No one else would dare to say something like that to anybody stronger than himself. I have never heard "pa" in my life.
     
  17. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    That's curious, because as far as I remember (I haven't heard anyone say it for a couple of years now) it was widely used by people from all walks of life, and in a different context, in my area.
     
  18. Ben Jamin Senior Member

    Norway
    Polish
    It was a clearly dominating way of speaking in the 50s in my region.
     
  19. marco_2 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    I should have written chodź ino tu, but it doesn't change the fact much. I took care of children from Kielce and the region (now woj.świętokrzyskie) and I heard it all the time.
     
  20. Mikelt New Member

    Oh, yeah. I can hear chodź ino tu in Silesia, as well.
     
  21. WalkerPL Junior Member

    Sweden
    Polish
    Pa and cho are ways of shortening patrz and chodź. They are very informal and used mainly by children.
     
  22. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Mainly, but not limited to. This is just to say.
     

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