1. No_C_Nada Senior Member

    Castillian - Perú
    ¿Cómo se traduce "pacay" al inglés?

    Como postre nos dieron pacays.


     
  2. Dlyons

    Dlyons Senior Member

    Dublin
    English - Ireland
  3. Yajaira

    Yajaira Senior Member

    Texas, USA
    U.S. English
    En inglés, se dice "guava o guava fruit." Aquí en los EEUU, muchos se confunden la "guava" (a veces escrito "guaba") con la "guayaba". Usan la palabra "guava" cuando realmente están hablando de "guayabas." A veces se comparan la fruta pacay con el "ice cream bean" porque sabe a helado.

    Para que sepa, generalmente, si es una comida típica no es necesario traducir el nombre al inglés. Nada más use la palabra "pacay" y explique que es una fruta nativa a Suramérica y describa cómo es.
     
  4. WestSideGal

    WestSideGal Senior Member

    English, US
    The guava and pacay are not related at all. They are completely different fruit. Pacay is more closely related to the "tamarindo", similar in shape in that they are both "pod" fruits.

    It is called "ice-cream bean" from what I have seen online. I don't think there is a translation for it as Dlyons and Yajaira have said.
     
  5. Yajaira

    Yajaira Senior Member

    Texas, USA
    U.S. English
    The guava/guaba and pacay are very similar. I lived in Panama for three years and the guava/guaba is also a long bean shaped pod with a kind of a fuzzy white fruit inside. If you do a Google image search for "Peruvian guaba" you will see what I am talking about. I'm sure you are thinking of the guayaba which is often called the guava in the US. It is green on the outside and reddish/pink on the inside with seeds similar to tomatoes.
     
  6. WestSideGal

    WestSideGal Senior Member

    English, US
    Yes, I see what you mean, Yajaira, which is why I detest using common names for plants/fruits because it can be quite confusing!!!! Latin name inga edulis or pacay.

    To use guava/guaba outside of the region in which it is commonly used to refer to pacay is very confusing, so I would refrain from offering that as an alternative name, especially outside of SA. You are correct in that pacay is just pacay and should be referred to as such.

    Guava/guayaba (Psidium) is understood here in the US and Caribbean as the fruit you have described, yellow sometimes green skin with pink flesh/fruit and seeds.
     

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