1. j1874t New Member

    Edinburgh
    Scotland, Scots & English
    What exactly is the Spanish translation for "pajero" or is this a Mexican Spanish word? I have been told that it actually means "wanker". Is this true?
    Gracias in advance
     
  2. meetheye Senior Member

    Concepción
    Chile, Spanish
    Well, in Chile we use "pajero", in a very colloquial way, to describe a person who is always tired and who doesn't like to work or do anything. Sometimes, instead of saying "tired" you say "pajero" (ex, No quiero ir estoy cansado/ No quiero ir estoy/ ando pajero)
    We also use it as a synonym of wanker, especially for men.

    Personally, I think it's a very nasty word.

    Hugs
     
  3. mia04 Senior Member

    UK
    english
    hi
    pajero- en sentido sexual significa " wanker/tosser"
    it can also mean liar.

    (Collins, Spanish Dictionary)
    :)
     
  4. j1874t New Member

    Edinburgh
    Scotland, Scots & English
    Thank you Vanessa for your reply to my query - it's just that in Europe & Australia the Japanese car company Mitsubishi call one of their 4 wheel drive vehicles "Pajero" but nobody really knows what it means.

    Thank you once again

    John:)
     
  5. meetheye Senior Member

    Concepción
    Chile, Spanish
    Yes, and that model here in Chile had to change the name because of the connotation of that word in my country.
     
  6. meetheye Senior Member

    Concepción
    Chile, Spanish
    course, I don't remember the name which it was used in my country, but I'll ask.
     
  7. rockbovia Junior Member

    Spain
    Mexican Spanish
    hello 1874j, I'm mexican and the word "pajero" at least in the central part of the country, really means nothing, but now I'm living in Spain and "pajero" has that sexual meaning it has been said above. Anyhow, paja means also straw, the food of horses and the pipe you drink liquids with. So if you're at a restaurant and ask for a paja, they will give you a straw, but you run the risk to be "fooled around" in a double sense of speaking. Hope I've helped. Bye
     
  8. j1874t New Member

    Edinburgh
    Scotland, Scots & English
    Thank you for replying - I could not find the word in the Spanish dictionary I have & just wondered if it was a Mexican or South/Central American word that has "crept" into Spanish as certain Brazilian words do not occur in Portugese in Portugal - once again thanx

    John
     
  9. beatrizg Senior Member

    Colombia, Spanish
    In Colombia you hear often the expression "hablar paja" (no sexual connotation here), which means: to talk rubbish.

    Regarding the original question, the term "pajero" has the meaning Mia mentioned ("wanker/tosser") but it’s not used very often.
     
  10. rockbovia Junior Member

    Spain
    Mexican Spanish
    Glad I could be a bit useful... and just to be a bit more specific when in restaurants:
    Spain: straw = paja
    Mexico: straw = popote
    Ciao!
     
  11. Whisky con ron Senior Member

    Scotland
    Venezuela / Español
    I've seen the "pajero" car, and although the word is not much used, it still sounds very funny to my ears..

    Mitsubishi should definitely get a Spanish assesor - they've called another or their cars "laputa".

    Ahem!
     
  12. meetheye Senior Member

    Concepción
    Chile, Spanish
    jajaja, yes "laputa" would be material for lots of jokes in my country, Chile.

    Literally: "laputa" "the-hore"

    Hugs.
     
  13. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    One hesitates to ask which model is considered better equipped in that company's product line.

    "No me gusta el pajero."
    "De acuerdo machote, debes comprarte laputa."

    This is almost as good as General Motors trying to sell the Chevy Nova [No va].
     
  14. meetheye Senior Member

    Concepción
    Chile, Spanish
    That's funny...course, like in hahaha funny.

    Saludos.
     
  15. Walter Apaéstegui New Member

    Spanish, Perú
    Hi all:

    Pajero according the Spanish Diccionary means "the person who carries straw." As slang language, in Perú and some other countries in South America means "the person who masturbates very often."
     
  16. Grekh

    Grekh Senior Member

    Cognin, France
    Spanish, Mexico
    Of course it has a meaning...exactly the one of the sexual connotation!--it's the person who masturbates very often... I'm also from the central part of Mexico (Guanajuato)
     
  17. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    I'm not sure that it's true, but I believe that I've heard that Jonathan Swift may have chosen the name Laputa as one of the imaginary countries in Gulliver's Travels precisely because of what the words meant in Spanish.
     
  18. heidita Senior Member

    Madrid, Spain
    Germany (German, English, Spanish)
    In Spain, please do not ask for a paja. That sounds really horrible (sexual connotation) You are supposed to ask for a

    pajita
     
  19. Elibennet

    Elibennet Senior Member

    Buenos Aires Argentina - castellano
    And don´t do it in Argentina either!
     
  20. Just_Wil

    Just_Wil Senior Member

    Spanish/ Costa Rica
    In Costa Rica "paja" means "bullshit". "Pajero" isn't used at all.
     
  21. CGodoyBA1

    CGodoyBA1 Junior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Argentina - español
    Hi!
    Yes, that would be the case in Argentina too, the one posted by Meetheye... if you go to some restaurant or your buying a soda you should ask for a "pajita"... but believe me, there's people who will laugh at you anyway...
    Regarding the "pajero" subject... it will have a sexual connotation, it will be like saying "wanker"...
    But it's gaining another meaning too... I think we've started to use it as they do in Chile, meaning "fiaca/vagancia"... for instance, "No quiero ir hoy, me dá paja viajar hasta allá" o "No quiere ir, es un pajero"
    Esto es algo que se viene dando sólo con los chicos muy muy jovencitos, y en algunos círculos solamente. Tal vez se empiece a extender...

    Cómo sea, espero aportado algo...
    :D
     
  22. lforestier

    lforestier Moderator

    San Antonio, TX USA
    Puerto Rico - Spanish/English
    In Puerto Rico, "hacer la paja" is slang for mastubate. The Mitsubishi Pajero was sold here as the Montero.
     
  23. Dr. Quizá

    Dr. Quizá Senior Member

    Esuri - Huelva York.
    Spain - Western Andalusian Spanish.
    Because all of this, the Mitsubishi Pajero has been sold all these years here as Mitsubishi Montero ;)
     
  24. ferdi

    ferdi Junior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Argentina, español
    Jajaja, It´s true! Maybe he is from Argentina :D
     
  25. loladamore Senior Member

    Zacatecas, México
    English UK
    También en el centro-norte de México pajero sería la persona que se hace la paja o pajita (se masturba). Será por eso que en esta página de Mitsubishi dice que: The Pajero awakens a rush of emotions. :eek:

    Esta página aclara que en España ese modelo se llama Montero, y gracias al debate de 'pajero', estoy pensando en el verbo montar y sus derivaciones...

    Qué bonito nombre de Mazda él de Laputa. Y también está el Nissan Moco.

    Me rindo.
     
  26. Marcos Loyola New Member

    Concepcion, CHILE
    Spanish-English
    In Chile, "pajero" means "wanker", but the "correct" mean of this word is "the person who carries straw".
    I dont know if in another countries have the same meaning...anyway i think is not the meaning who wanted to give the mitsubishi people to their jeeps!... in fact, in chile the Pajero Jepp is better known as "montero".
     
  27. ferdi

    ferdi Junior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Argentina, español
    jajaja, interesante, habría que analizarlo seriamente! :eek: QUE LOCO!
     
  28. luis masci

    luis masci Senior Member

    Córdoba
    Argentina-español
    El aeropuerto de la ciudad de Córdoba tomó el nombre del lugar donde fue construido y se llama “Aeropuerto de Pajas Blancas”.
    No tiene para nosotros connotaciones risueñas (supongo que es porque estamos acostumbrados) pero si resulta extraño y risueño para gente que no es de Córdoba.
    En Argentina entera la palabra “pajero” significa también “wanker”.
     
  29. lforestier

    lforestier Moderator

    San Antonio, TX USA
    Puerto Rico - Spanish/English
    Tampoco en mi país pida "paja" ni "popote" con sus bebidas. Pida "sorbetos"
     
  30. Kelin

    Kelin New Member

    Guatemala
    Español, Guatemala
    In Guatemala "pajero" means lier.
     
  31. Lilith1981 Junior Member

    Spanish, Spain
    In England the Pajero/Montero has been called Mitsubishi Shogun. ¡Quite a few names for the same car!

    Apart from that, in Spain we don't usually use "pajero", at least I've never heard it over here. I think it's more of a South-American word. "Pajillero" is more common.
     
  32. heidita Senior Member

    Madrid, Spain
    Germany (German, English, Spanish)
    ¡Esto sí que es grande! ¡Bienvenido al foro!

    ¿Y cómo se llama al pajero (el de masturbarse )? ¡Qué divertido!
     
  33. Oliverio Grande New Member

    San Sebastian
    Spanish (Spain)
    Mitsubishi Pajero is Mitsubishi MONTERO in Spain.
     
  34. Mate

    Mate Senior Member

    Argentina
    Castellano - Argentina
    ¡Lola! ¡Qué boquita,eh!
     
  35. loladamore Senior Member

    Zacatecas, México
    English UK
    ¿Acaso dije alguna grosería?
     
  36. Mate

    Mate Senior Member

    Argentina
    Castellano - Argentina
    :eek: Lola, you crack me up!:confused:

    Mira que modosa, recatada y hasta pacata nos hiciste creer que eras aquí.:p
     
  37. loladamore Senior Member

    Zacatecas, México
    English UK
    ¿Trapitos al sol, pues?
    Cuidate, Mate, porque si no, te pondré en evidencia el día menos pensado...:mad: ;)
     
  38. rajel

    rajel Junior Member

    Spanish, Mexico.
    Yep! as one person correctly said pajero doesn't mean anything in central Mexico, but it certainly sounds like paja (masturbation) it's well understood in Mexico but some other words are commonly used instead. words that I don't know if we can use here unless anyone requests them. anyway if we want to stick with the word pajero it would be best to say "pajeador" but nobody says that. adios amigos!
     
  39. heidita Senior Member

    Madrid, Spain
    Germany (German, English, Spanish)
  40. heidita Senior Member

    Madrid, Spain
    Germany (German, English, Spanish)
  41. ferdi

    ferdi Junior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Argentina, español
    Jajaja, no sé si en el resto del mundo significarán
    algo o no estas palabras, pero en Argentina todas
    significan algo grosero! Mi teoría es que hay un
    argentino gracioso en japón o donde sea, que le
    pone los nombres a los autos o camionetas con
    toda la intención! No sé, es re loco que haya tanta
    coincidencia, no creen? Además no me extraña para
    nada, porque eso sería algo típico argentino, jeje
     
  42. Mate

    Mate Senior Member

    Argentina
    Castellano - Argentina
    [​IMG]

    Les presento al pequeño Mazda (que no Mitsubishi) Laputa. A diferencia del M. Pajero, creo que en este caso el nombre podría arrancar ese tipo de exclamaciones entre el público masculino. Ej: ¡Laaaaaputa que te compraste un auto che!

    Muy distinto es si al novel comprador le dicen: ¿Te compraste nomás el Mitsubishi, pajero?

    Saludos - Mate
     
  43. jolugega Senior Member

    spanish, spain
    Pajero. or rather " pajillero" might mean a " jerker" in American english, that is why Mitsubishi had to change the make of this car in Spain.
     
  44. xmanta

    xmanta Senior Member

    London, United Kingdom
    Spanish (Uruguay)
    Mi idioma nativo es la misma variedad de español que hablan los argentinos y "pajero" es alguien que se masturba muy a menudo :cool:. Eso es lo que entendió el argentino. En este contexto no tiene nada que ver con "wanker". Por eso no te quiso explicar el motivo.
     
  45. Lilith1981 Junior Member

    Spanish, Spain
    Lo de Laputa probablemente sea por la isla imaginaria de Los viajes de Gulliver. Aunque es probable que Swift sí supiera lo que significa Laputa (hablaba el español con fluidez), ello no quiere decir que los ingleses supiesen de qué iba el tema :)
     
  46. xmanta

    xmanta Senior Member

    London, United Kingdom
    Spanish (Uruguay)
    el "laputa" se presta para mal entendidos en el tránsito cuando la gente empieza a gritarse cosas, por eso yo estoy pensando en comprarme un "Nissan Moco", color verde, como sale en la foto.
     
  47. Jorgech Junior Member

    Chilean Spanish
    pajero es jerck off
     
  48. Zio Gilito Senior Member

    Sevilla, España
    Español - España
    In Spain, as I read upwards, that means "tosser", but it is not very used
     
  49. Lilith1981 Junior Member

    Spanish, Spain
    Brilliant!! :rolleyes:
     
  50. Lilith1981 Junior Member

    Spanish, Spain
    I'd only heard "pajillero" up until now, but even so, "pajero" is too close for comfort :D
     

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