pana mea

Discussion in 'Română (Romanian)' started by margareta9, Jun 2, 2013.

  1. margareta9 New Member

    English - UK
    I'm confused by the expression "pana mea", which I've encountered several times in the novel Pervertirea (Cristina Nemerovschi). Here's an example where one character asks about a girl who has disappeared:
    "Bă, tu ai făcut ceva cu Amalia?! Ai răpit-o?! Unde pana mea e Amalia? Ai omorât-o, nenorocitule?"
     
  2. farscape mod-errare humanum est

    Ottawa, Canada
    Romanian
    It's a slang expression, something like "Where the frack is Amalia?" Let me know if you want all the details (expletive, only a man should use it) and I'll send them to you in a PM.

    Later,
    .
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2013
  3. margareta9 New Member

    English - UK
    Hi there, if you say only a man should use this expletive, then I can guess that it's short for another expression beginning p*** m**. No further explanation needed! Thanks for your help.
     
  4. irinet

    irinet Senior Member

    Bucharest
    Romanian
    I use "pana mea", and other females do so, farscape. It seems to me that this slang expression is milder than the explicit one you mentioned above.
     
  5. farscape mod-errare humanum est

    Ottawa, Canada
    Romanian
    Sure you do and so are many other women, without truly grasping where it's coming from. Same thing happens with băga-mi-aş... picioarele, right? :p

    Later,
    .
     
  6. irinet

    irinet Senior Member

    Bucharest
    Romanian
    Cam aşa ceva, însă, te īntreb dacă te gândeşti că 'pana' e în strânsă legătură cu 'cocoşul' care cântă în casă?
    Eu cred că tocmai de aceea a apărut acest sinonim, sā-i zicem, ca să-l putem folosi şi noi fără a avea remuşcări prea mari în privința vulgarității neexplicite.
     
  7. farscape mod-errare humanum est

    Ottawa, Canada
    Romanian
    That's a good one, thanks! :D

    I think we're mixing a few things here:

    1. There is a very specific context, given by the OP, in which pana mea is used by a male. It's very likely that the author has used it to circumvent using the expletive, for editorial reasons.
    2. A rose by any other name is still... a rose: if you look up darn in a dictionary you'll see that the meaning is what it is and the prudes will be offended in exactly the same way as if damn was used
    3. I'm all for gender equality and absolute truth :p but let's keep things in their "historic" perspective :) (we should probably stop here).

    As a side note, whenever possible, please try to reply in the language of the first post in a thread.

    Best,
    .
     

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