partir de bonne heure

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by gpuri, Jan 2, 2013.

  1. gpuri

    gpuri Senior Member

    Melbourne, Australia
    English, Aust.
    Vous voulez partir de bonne heure de Paris-Gare de Lyon.

    Bonjour,

    I would like to know why 'de bonne heure' is used in the sentence below as opposed to 'tôt' or 'en avance'.

    Vous voulez partir de bonne heure de Paris-Gare de Lyon.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 2, 2013
  2. Yllanos

    Yllanos Senior Member

    because de bonne heure is always early in the morning, not tôt and not en avance which can be any time before the departure. at least that's how I understand it.
     
  3. Lly4n4 Senior Member

    Paris (ex-Grand Ouest)
    Français (France)
    You can leave "tôt le matin" (= "de bonne heure"), but also "tôt l'après-midi" or "tôt le soir"; "tôt" stands only for "early".

    And you can leave "tôt le matin", but still be late, if you planned previously to leave the day before. You must got a schedule to be "en avance".
     
  4. jetset

    jetset Senior Member

    France\Nice
    French
    Vous voulez partir de bonne heure/tôt de Paris-Gare de Lyon : it relates to the train time, you prefer a train leaving early in the day.

    Vous voulez partir en avance [from home] : it relates to your own time, you prefer to arrive in advance at the station not to miss the train.
     
  5. petit1 Senior Member

    français - France
    "de bonne heure" and "tôt" are exactly the same thing.
     
  6. gpuri

    gpuri Senior Member

    Melbourne, Australia
    English, Aust.
    If this is true, then how can you explain the difference in the two sentences below: are the two words interchangeable or specific for each sentence?

    Je suis fatiguée, maman. Il est encore tôt, non?

    Demain matin, tu vas te réveiller de bonne heure, tu m'entends?
     
  7. Yendred Senior Member

    Paris
    Français - France
    Maman pourrait dire aussi "Demain matin, tu vas te réveiller tôt"

    Ca serait correct aussi que l'enfant dise "Je suis fatiguée, maman. Il est encore de bonne heure, non?", mais l'expression ne fait pas partie du langage enfantin, plutôt du langage soutenu ou imagé.

    Marcel Proust ouvre son Du côté de chez Swann par "Longtemps, je me suis couché de bonne heure." Ca ne situe clairement pas ce moment tôt le matin.
     
  8. PtiFutee Senior Member

    US, English
    In your first example, "je suis fatiguée..." the child could be saying this at any hour of the day, where de bonne heure usually implies early morning. (If it were my son, he'd be saying this at 11:30 am!!! And in that case, I'd respond with the second example..... meaning you're not sleeping until 11:30, you're going to get up early!! Like 8 am hahaha)

    Suppose it is 6:30 pm... "I'm tired, Mom. It's still early isn't it?" Meaning, perhaps... Gosh, it's only 6:30 pm and I'm already tired--it's still early, though (too early to go to bed). It might have nothing to do with a wake-up time.

    I think in your second example the two are interchangeable, but to me de bonne heure implies early morning and not just early.

    IMHO, you would only use "de bonne heure" in the first example if the sentence were being said in the morning (anywhere from 1 am to say, 8 am) or as Yendred said, if there was something special in the context calling for imagery.

    I'm curious--were these two example sentences in a lesson, to contrast the nuance in meaning between tôt and de bonne heure?

    PF
     
  9. gpuri

    gpuri Senior Member

    Melbourne, Australia
    English, Aust.
    oui, the two words were in a dialogue in which I had to fill in the missing words. I am using Vis-à-Vis 3rd Edition by Haddley.
    Thank you for your responses.
     
  10. jetset

    jetset Senior Member

    France\Nice
    French
    As Lly4n4 explained, tôt refers to the lower bound of a certain period (morning, afternoon, evening...), tard being the upper bound.
     

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