Past tense of "raise"

Discussion in 'English Only' started by AngelEyes, Jan 15, 2010.

  1. AngelEyes Senior Member

    English - United States
    What is the correct form of this verb for this sentence?

    a. He threw back the covers and raised up onto his knees.
    b. He threw back the covers and rose up onto his knees.

    I think it's raised.

    Obviously, I'm not sure, though.


    Thanks...

    AngelEyes
     
  2. Driven

    Driven Senior Member

    USA/English
    I believe that raised is the past tense of raise, and rose is the past tense of rise. Since one raises up on ones knees, then the correct past tense would be raised.
     
  3. AngelEyes Senior Member

    English - United States
    Thanks, Driven.

    That's what I thought, too.

    It's just that Dictionary.com states that rise means to get up from a lying-down position. For my example, that's what he's doing.

    He's lying down and gets up on his knees, so he's rising. I figured then that maybe he rose up onto his knees.
     
  4. Driven

    Driven Senior Member

    USA/English
    Ok, now I'm confused. The question really is, do you raise up on your knees, or rise up on your knees or either one? He rose up on his knees doesn't sound bad to my ears. It's late for me and my brain is kind of mushy so I'm not sure anymore. Sorry!
     
  5. AngelEyes Senior Member

    English - United States
    Yes, I'm tired, too, and just as confused.

    Thanks, anyway. :)
     
  6. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    You have the right rules. ;)

    Raise is something you do to something else, and the past tense is raised.
    He raised his knees.
    Rise is what you do yourself, and the past tense is rose.
    He rose up onto his knees.
    Here is a thread with different examples: rise & raise
     
  7. AngelEyes Senior Member

    English - United States
    Thanks, Cagey! I did do a search, but I didn't see that thread.

    Your explanation really helped. I also realized that these verbs are either transitive or intransitive. That makes it even clearer.

    My sentence contains an adverb and a prepositional phrase, so, of course, it's rose.

    AngelEyes
     

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