perfiles laminados en acero inoxidable

Discussion in 'Specialized Terminology' started by BRUJA4, Jun 13, 2010.

  1. BRUJA4 New Member

    SPANISH - SPAIN
    Hola a todos.

    Espero que alguien sepa de estos términos relacionados con la estructura de una máquina recicladora de vidrio. Necesito saber cómo se traduce al inglés "perfiles laminados" en la siguiente frase:

    - La estructura está formada por perfiles laminados en acero inoxidable

    Gracias.
     
  2. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    By ''la estructura" I'm guessing they mean the framework, and "perfiles" is beams (usually heavyweight) or angle steel/angle iron.
    The structure is formed of laminated stainless steel angle bar.
    But see what rodelu says ...
     
  3. BRUJA4 New Member

    SPANISH - SPAIN
    Thanks again for your answer. It's a pleasure a native American helps me with this specialized vocabulary.
     
  4. Cubanboy

    Cubanboy Senior Member

    Cuba
    Spanish
    perfiles laminados - rolled structural sections //beams.
     
  5. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

  6. Cubanboy

    Cubanboy Senior Member

    Cuba
    Spanish
    Thanks for calling me an expert, but I'm not. I've previously translated a few texts related to the above context.

    Here's what I'd do with ''inoxidable'':

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=es&q="rolled stainless steel sections"&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=iw


    It's a real pleasure for me to share knowledge and experience with you.
    Regards,
    CB.
     
  7. pacosancas Senior Member

    Vigo
    Spanish (Spain- Castilian)
    Hola,

    Yo estoy con Cubanboy... mi traducción sería:

    Perfiles laminados en acero inoxidable: Stainless steel rolled sections (yo no usaría aquí structural, puesto que pueden existir aplicaciones diferentes)
     
  8. BRUJA4 New Member

    SPANISH - SPAIN
    And what do you think about "stainless steel laminated bars"???
     
  9. BRUJA4 New Member

    SPANISH - SPAIN
    By the way, thanks so much for you answers. It's very kind of you.
     
  10. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    I would definitely say "rolled stainless steel sections" rather than "stainless steel rolled sections." A Google search will confirm it, but the reason for the word order is that the more essential the adjective is, the closer it goes to the noun. In this case "rolled stainless steel" is what the sections are made of. They aren't viewed as "rolled sections" made of steel.
    Sorry if I haven't explained that very well!
     
  11. pacosancas Senior Member

    Vigo
    Spanish (Spain- Castilian)
    You did!


    Thanks for that! I didn't know.:thumbsup:
     
  12. pacosancas Senior Member

    Vigo
    Spanish (Spain- Castilian)
    I wouldn't use laminated here, but rolled.

    Lamination is the process of joining two or more sheets or layers of materials to build another material having better mechanical properties. An example is plywood.

    Rolling is the process of manufacturing plates, sections, pipes, etc., by passing a ductile material (such as steel) through a set of rollers, thus decreasing its section and improving its mechanical properties.

    In Spanish, you would use the same word for both (laminación/laminar/laminado), but not in English.
     
  13. BRUJA4 New Member

    SPANISH - SPAIN
    I suggested "laminated" because a native american told me that... But i guess he hasn't got it right... I realise to be native hasn't nothing to do with having the proper word... Don't you think so? Thank you so much for your help!!!
     
  14. abeltio Senior Member

    Spanish, Argentina
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2010
  15. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    I think the terms "shapes" and "profiles" are found mostly in translations, when the poor translators don't know what else to say for "perfiles" ... ;)
     
  16. abeltio Senior Member

    Spanish, Argentina
    I am not expert enough to disagree, perhaps this comment should be addressed to the AISC (American Institute of Steel Construction) to alert them that their use of the word "shape" is inadequate and their bibliography in English was prepared by poor translators...
     
  17. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    All I can tell you is that the beams or sections themselves don't usually seem to be called "shapes" except in reference to the specific cross-section -- I, H, W or whatever -- which is how the term is used by the AISC.
    And by "poor translators" I didn't mean "poor-quality" ;)
     

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