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pero difícilmente pasará de curso

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by yarka, Dec 4, 2012.

  1. yarka Senior Member

    Spanish
    Hi everybody,

    I would like to know how I can say: 'pero dificilmente' in English. For instance, I want to say:

    'Él se ha esforzado mucho, pero dificilmente, pasará de curso'

    My try is:

    'He has made an effort, but hardly, he will pass to the following course'

    Is it correct?

    Thank you very much.
    -Y-
     
  2. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    No, hardly is not the adverbial equivalent of hard / difficult. But your original sentence is unclear. Do you mean that he will pass, but only with difficulty? Or that he has worked hard, but with difficulty?
     
  3. yarka Senior Member

    Spanish
    Well, I want to say: He has made a lot of effort but unfortunatelly he is very probable to retake the same course.

    Thank you.
    -Y-
     
  4. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    I'd probably say "He has put a lot of effort into it but he'll probably have to retake the course."
     
  5. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    Or "he is unlikely to go on to the next year/course"
    I usually like "unlikely" for "difícilmente" in this sense, though I must admit that Chris' version sounds more natural than mine. It's just the word "course" that is bothering me.
    Is the expression "to stay down" understood everywhere? That would have been used in my school for "repetir curso":
     
  6. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    It's not used much in the US. We get "held back" or "kept back."
     
  7. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    OK. Thanks.
     
  8. juan082937 Senior Member

    español
    difícilmente=hardly, probably not, unlikely

    He has tried very hard but probably not will pass the course
    He has put forth a lot of effort but it is unlikely he will pass the course
    He has tried his best but won't pass the course
    he has striven for his course but will unlikely pass it.
    I hope a native will improve those examples.
     
  9. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    They're all great, except the last one.
     
  10. juan082937 Senior Member

    español
    Tx a lot ChrisK
     
  11. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    I insist that I'm concerned about the expression "pasar de curso", as I don't interpret it as being the same thing as "passing a course". I don't know if it's the same in all the Spanish speaking world, but I take it as going on to the next year of one and the same course/study scheme.
     
  12. Peterdg

    Peterdg Senior Member

    Belgium
    Dutch - Belgium
    I agree. I would also interpret it that way. "Passing a course" would be "aprobar" (at least in my flavour of Spanish).
     
  13. SevenDays Senior Member

    Spanish
    To me, pasar de curso means going on to the next grade, as in, for example, going from 4th grade to 5th grade. Passing a course suggests passing a specific class. So, if I passed Algebra I, I can go on to take Algebra II, or, If I passed Algebra, I can take Geometry.
    Cheers
     
  14. JJohnson

    JJohnson Senior Member

    Southwest Texas
    Texan English
    But the sentence says that he will pass, doesn't it?
    'Él se ha esforzado mucho, pero dificilmente, pasará de curso'
    'He has made an effort, but hardly, he will pass to the following course'
    How about:
    He tried really hard and barely passed the course.
    he worked very hard and, with difficulty, passed the course.
    In AE one would not say "to the next course".
     
  15. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    We don't know what level or age this is referring to. Elementary school? University? The translations would be different, obviously.
    Based on what SevenDays et al. said, it sounds like a child failing a grade.
    The original shouldn't have a comma after "dificilmente," by the way.
     
  16. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    As has been said, we are guessing a bit, but everything I've said is based on the supposition that that comma shouldn't be there.
     

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