pero hindi ka na ito

Discussion in 'Tagalog and Filipino Languages' started by anisepower, Jul 2, 2014.

  1. anisepower New Member

    Australia
    English
    Hi everyone. I'm a half filipina learning tagalog. I just want some clarification on what this means:
    pero, hindi ka na ito.

    It's from a paragraph someone put on facebook. The entire thing is:
    mahal ko ang aking sinta.
    mahal ko ang aking pamilya.
    mahal ko ang aking mga kaibigan.
    pero, hindi ka na ito.

    I understand they are saying they love their family and friends, etc. but what about the last part? Am I correct in saying it would directly translate to "but, you are not this?" The grammar is a bit confusing for me :S
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2014
  2. DotterKat Moderator

    California, USA
    English (American)
    You are partly correct. The na linker connects the (second person singular) personal pronoun ka with the demonstrative pronoun ito, which taken in context here represents sinta/pamilya/kaibigan. The whole is negated by hindi. A more precise translation of that last line would be:

    You are no longer this = this functions as a demonstrative pronoun standing for the aforementioned sinta/pamilya/kaibigan (one could argue that the plural these [hindi ka na ang mga ito] should have been used, but we will allow some latitude for poetic license and take sinta/pamilya/kaibigan as one unit).

    I love my sweetheart.
    I love my family.
    I love my friends.
    But, you are no longer this (these).

    Therefore, what the writer is saying is that he/she used to regard the recipient of the text as a sweetheart, family and friend... but that is no longer the case.
     
  3. anisepower New Member

    Australia
    English
    Thank you DotterKat, very informative! Although I had to read: "The na linker connects the (second person singular) personal pronoun ka with the demonstrative pronoun ito," a few times before I got it >.<

    So with 'hindi ka na ito' they are essentially saying that the person is no longer of the previously mentioned. But then what implies that the person actually was one of those things? Is that just an assumption we made because of the context or is there something we have to change for it to say simply 'you are not any of these'?
     
  4. mataripis

    mataripis Senior Member

    Exactly.In Other Tagalog form, nguni't iba ka na ngayon!
     
  5. DotterKat Moderator

    California, USA
    English (American)
    One will often hear married people describe their spouse as "my sweetheart, my best friend, my family, etc." In a similar fashion, the writer of this text used to regard the other person as their "sweetheart, family and friend" all rolled into one. It is not an assumption we have to make as it is quite apparent in the text.
    I second mataripis' suggestion "nguni't iba ka na ngayon" (but now you are different). This again implies a change from one state to another: that of "sweetheart/family/friend" to....something else that is no longer "sweetheart/family/friend".

    To maintain the first-person point of view used throughout most of the text, my suggestion for an alternative last line would be:

    I love my sweetheart,
    I love my family,
    I love my friends,
    But now I see you differently.

    Mahal ko ang aking sinta,
    Mahal ko ang aking pamilya,
    Mahal ko ang aking mga kaibigan,
    Ngunit' iba na ang tingin ko sa iyo ngayon.
    [OR Nguni't iba na ang turing ko sa iyo ngayon.]

    Take note however, that neither my nor matiripis' suggestions for the final line are as direct as the original text ("pero, hindi ka na ito"= But, you are no longer this) which really ties the whole idea together, that the writer used to regard the recipient as someone very dear (sweetheart, family and friend all in one) but that is no longer true.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2014
  6. anisepower New Member

    Australia
    English
    I have another question. What would removing 'na' do to the sentence? Would that not make sense, make it sound weird, etc?
     
  7. DotterKat Moderator

    California, USA
    English (American)
    Dropping the na would not make the sentence sound weird but it would substantially alter its meaning. Na in your original sentence is really functioning more as an adverb (no longer) than a mere linker and this is made evident by dropping it altogether as you have suggested. The change in meaning may be subtle but quite important.

    1) pero, hindi ka na ito (but you are no longer this): Let's say a man meets a woman, falls in love with her to the point that he considers her his "sweetheart/family/friend". However, he eventually realizes after perhaps some act of betrayal on her part that he was after all mistaken about her and tells her "I used to consider you my sweetheart, part of my family and my best friend....pero hindi ka na ito (but you are no longer this)".

    1) pero, hindi ka ito (but you are not this): Now let's say a man meets a woman he thinks he might be interested in but almost immediately comes to the conclusion, perhaps because of starkly different personalities, that they are not compatible at all. This man may have been searching for his soul mate (his sweetheart/family/friend) and thought that he had found her, but very soon decides that she is not the one ("you are not this", that is, the person he was looking for).

    So, in the original sentence pero, hindi ka na ito (but you are no longer this), the realization, and regret, comes after some time. In the second sentence pero, hindi ka ito (but you are not this) the recognition of their mutual incompatibility comes sooner.
     
  8. anisepower New Member

    Australia
    English
    Ahhh I see I see. So it does have a meaning after all. So far I only know how to use it as a connecting word, but that means I can use in other ways too. I'll have to do some more research :)
    Thanks again for the replies.
     
  9. I agree.

    I think the "na" meant to be dropped based on the context.
     
  10. Equinozio Junior Member

    Tagalog
    That's right. Na is not a linker here. It is an enclitic word (particle in this case) meaning "no longer" or "now (unlike before)", so it means there has been a change.

    It has many uses. For more examples, see Na: Tagalog enclitic particle.

    So in this sentence:
    Pero, hindi ka na ito. -> But, you are no longer this (i.e. sweetheart/family/friend).
     

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