Persian: مش

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by seitt, Aug 30, 2010.

  1. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Greetings,

    While watching a number of serials on Iran TV, I've noticed that a number of people have مش 'mash' before their names (only men, I think).

    So, for example, in فاصله‌ها the cook was called مش رحیم. But what exactly does this مش mean? Is it of Persian or Arabic origin? Anything to do with حاج?

    All the best, and many thanks,

    Simon
     
  2. arashgh1987 Senior Member

    persian
    haji حاجي is someone who has gone on pilgrimage to mecca .
    (مشهدي (مش is someone who has gone on pilgrimage to Mashhad ( holy city where Holy sepulcher of Imam Reza is there).
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2010
  3. Bonjour Simon !

    En effet il y a une ville religieuse en iran nommée Machad dans laquelle on a Le Saint Reza امام رضا (enterré dans cette ville)
    Chaque personne qui voyage à Machad afin de prier Le Saint Reza امام رضا prend un petit nom avant son nom d'origine مشهدی
    Et مش c'est la forme compressée du nom مشهدی (Machadi) en langage iranien
    Par ex : si vous voyagez à Machad pour prier Reza on vous appellera
    Machadi Simon ou Mach simon مش سیمون / مشهدی سیمون:D
    Iman = Mach Iman (après avoir voyagé à Machad)

    Attenetion ! j'insiste que مش se rejoint à votre nom juste quand vous y voyagez afin de prier Le saint Reza et pas d'un voyage d'affaire par exemple !

    Par contre celui qui voyage à Make pour prier Dieu s'appellera Hadji حاجی
    حاجی سیمون/ حاج سیمون Hadji Simon / Hadj Simon :D

    Et celui qui va à Karbala en iraq pour prier Le saint Hossin امام حسین s'appellera کربلایی
    کبلایی سیمون / کربلایی سیمون karbalai Simon / kablai Simon :D

    Oui cette régle est exclusivement pour les hommes !
    J'espère que j'ai bien expliqué :);)
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2010
  4. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Vraiment, l'Iran c'est un autre monde.
    Je le dis dans le plus beau sens de l'expression!
    Merci,
    Simon
     
  5. searcher123

    searcher123 Senior Member

    My home ;-) /The Persian Gulf
    Farsi/Persian/فارسي
    I think I should add a more note to arashgh1987 and IMANAKBARI descriptions (maybe because I can not understand French and I don't know what IMANAKBARI was told to you at his answer :))

    There is two type of Hadj: essential Hadj (حج واجب or حج تمتع) and recommended Hadj (حج مستحب or حج عمره). Hadji (حاجي or حاج or حاج آقا for males and حاجيه خانم or حاج خانم for females) is attached to a name just if he/she was went to حج تمتع.

    Remark: We call a clergyman حاج آقا (or a clergywoman حاج خانم) even if he is not went to حج تمتع at all. Also you can use حاج آقا or حاج خانم separately (i.e. without attaching to a name) for curtsy. For example if you want to ask time of a strange man, you can say: حاج آقا ساعت چنده؟

    Also مشتي (Mashti) is another equivalent for مشهدي or مشدي too.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2010

  6. بله ! من این موضوع را به آقای سیمون توضیح نداده بودم
    :thumbsup:من هم توضیحات سرچر123 را تایید می کنم

    Quant à ce sujet oui ! je ne l'avais pas expliqué à monsieur simon
    Je confirme les explications de Searcher123 :thumbsup:
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2010
  7. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Thank you so much, all is crystal clear.

    God bless you all,

    Jerusalemite Simon :)
     
  8. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Can we also use مَشْت (masht)? Or is it better spelt مَشْد?
     
  9. searcher123

    searcher123 Senior Member

    My home ;-) /The Persian Gulf
    Farsi/Persian/فارسي
    In short form, مشت or مشد it is not common. At least I have not heard it to now. The short form is مش.
     
  10. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Many thanks, all clear now.
     

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